Chabot College

Academic Program Review Report

 

 

Year Two of

Program Review Cycle

 

 

Astronomy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted on 2/28/13

Scott Hildreth

 


 

Table of Contents

 

Section A:  What Progress Have We Made? ............................... 3

Section B:  What Changes Do We Suggest?................................ 5

 

Required Appendices:

 

A:  Budget History..................................................................................... 7

B1:  Course Learning Outcomes Assessment Schedule................................ 9

B2:  “Closing the Loop” Assessment Reflections ....................................... 10

C:  Program Learning Outcomes.............................................................. 17

D:  A Few Questions ............................................................................... 19

E:  New Initiatives ................................................................................... 20

F3:  FTEF Requests.................................................................................. 22

F5:  Supplies and Services Requests......................................................... 23

F6:  Conference/Travel Requests............................................................. 24

F7:  Technology and Other Equipment Requests...................................... 25

F8:  Facilities Requests............................................................................. 26


A.  What Progress Have We Made?


We had the following Program Goals for Year 1 of the Cycle for Astronomy:


0)  Prepare for relocation of Astronomy lab to Building 1800 by start of Spring 2013.

1)      Increase Planetarium Shows for the Public in Spring 2011 and Fall 2012

2)      Astronomy Curriculum Update by Fall 2012

3)      Start Astronomy PLO review by Spring 2013

4)      Astronomy Lab Course Curriculum improvements by Fall 2013

5)      Continued Student Success Research Regional/Statewide - ongoing

6)      Textbook/Online system evaluation - ongoing

7)      Fundraising for the planetarium – ongoing

 

We achieved the first three goals as projected, on time.  We offered 5 public shows that were well attended, and hosted two special events. We are discussing the Program-level outcomes at every team meeting, and making good progress on the Astronomy Lab Course curriculum improvement goal with our new series of labs based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. 

 

In our first year review, we also identified as crucial to the success of our overall program:

-          Finding a permanent location on campus for a small roof-top observatory;  and

-          Arranging for laboratory technician support (in concert with physics) to help us organize and maintain the lab courses.


We have not made progress on either of these program needs, and they remain two of our most significant challenges in the upcoming year.  In addition to these, the continued requirements for faculty to maintain the planetarium equipment and classroom is a significant challenge, involving a significant time commitment over and above existing collegial participation.

 

Two areas that we are working very hard upon, and showing progress with, are:

 

-          Utilizing the new Chabot College Planetarium to its utmost, and tracking how it plays a positive role in student success; and,

-          Demonstrating cross-campus leadership with technology in teaching, utilizing new online resources and tools to engage students even more effectively.

We recognize that the new planetarium is more expensive, in terms of maintenance costs but even more in terms of time required by faculty to maintain it – currently at least 5 hours a week, with additional time required during component or system failures, and for maintenance.

To justify that cost, we are committed to use the facility in creative ways, and share it across the campus whenever possible.    We continue to ask whether using the planetarium compared with traditional lecture halls seems to result in greater student success, and are happy to see in just 3 years of continued use a positive trend in student success:

 

 

Success

Non-Success

Withdrawal

Total

 

 

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

Fall 2008-
Spring 2010
(taught in lecture halls, while Bldg 1900 under construction)

561

51%

243

22%

302

27%

561

Fall 2010 –
Spring 2011
(First full academic year teaching in the planetarium)

973

55%

348

20%

445

25%

1,766

Fall 2011
Spring 2012

(Second full academic year teaching in the planetarium)

300

61%

96

20%

95

19%

491


Chabot College
Campus - wide

 

66% 

 

16% 

 

 17%

 


The data indicates both that our student success is increasing over the last two years, and that we are retaining more students overall.  These data include classes taught by four very different faculty, each utilizing very different teaching strategies in their courses.  The only common denominator really is our planetarium, and how we are becoming more used to its capabilities and power.

We are also pleased to continue our technical leadership across campus, using the experience from the planetarium and its significant AV capabilities to guide colleagues and committees with the planning for new buildings and support.  We continue to look for opportunities to share the facility with interested colleagues in the Fine Arts, Language Arts, and Social Sciences, as well as using it for other sciences besides Astronomy.

 

To further expand our opportunities for school and public shows, we have also undertaken fund-raising and outreach efforts spearheaded by Tim Dave, who created a crowd-funding site for the planetarium, and an online event registration system to facilitate payment.  We hope to utilize both more in the coming years to further enhance the visibility, outreach, and impact of the jewel of our Chabot College campus.



 

B.  What Changes Do We Suggest?

 

Review the Strategic Plan goal and key strategies at http://www.chabotcollege.edu/prbc/StrategicPlan/SPforPR.pdf prior to completing your narrative.   Please complete Appendices E (New Initiatives) and F1-8 (Resources Requested) to further detail your narrative.   Limit your narrative to two pages, and be very specific about what you hope to achieve, why, and how.

 

Given your experiences and student achievement results over the past year, what changes do you suggest to your course/program improvement plan?  What new initiatives might you begin to support the achievement of our Strategic Plan goal?  Do you have new ideas to improve student learning?  What are your specific, measurable goals?  How will you achieve them?   Would any of these require collaboration with other disciplines or areas of the college?  How will make that collaboration occur?

 

 Increase the number of students that achieve their educational goal within a reasonable time by clarifying pathways and providing more information and support.”


The Astronomy Program at Chabot is a critical component to the success of our College’s strategic goal, as it offers our students a popular, efficient, and technologically sophisticated means of succeeding in their degree and transfer plans.  To be even more effective, we need:

-                A larger FTEF allocation, so that we can offer more students greater opportunity to fulfill their GE science requirements, and directly impact the number of students achieving their goals.

-                Additional laboratory facilities, in the shape of roof-top access somewhere on campus to house the small observatory and telescopes we already have, but cannot use effectively due to campus light pollution and security constraints.

-                Restoration of faculty reassignment time to support the planetarium and astronomy lab. When all faculty reassignment time was eliminated 3+ years ago, we lost the small (2 CAH) token of time that historically had been granted to help with the required maintenance and operations of the planetarium and astronomy lab.   Astronomy and Physics have no laboratory technician support (unlike the Biology and Chemistry subdivisions, and also unlike the Astronomy and Physics subdivisions at Las Positas College).  And during the same period that the reassignment time was lost, our maintenance and operations workload has more than doubled with the addition of a much more technically complex planetarium AV system, lighting system, projection system, and two building renovation projects.   Additional reassignment time will also help us to offer more programs for the campus and public, further supporting our College and Campus.

B. What Changes Do We Suggest? – page two

Our specific goals for the program during the next year of our program review cycle, and what we hope to achieve, include:

-          Implement the new Solar Dynamics Observatory labs in Astronomy 30, and use the results to transform other activities in the laboratory class to even more hands-on, active student science.  We already are in the process of sharing our progress to date, with an accepted Poster Paper to be displayed at the 2013 LWS/SDO Science Workshop "Exploring the Network of Solar Activity" March 3-8, 2013 in Cambridge, Maryland , and hopefully a presentation at the 2013 Cosmos in the Classroom national meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in July. 

We hope this work will lead to continued curriculum improvements, generating even more interest from Chabot’s students in taking the astronomy lecture courses as well as the lab, and – if demand increases – leading the way towards expanding the program with additional lab sections.

-          Continuing our work in evaluating the overall Astronomy program as it relates to the needs of students seeking GE credit for their AA/AS degress, and/or fulfillment of their CSU and UC transfer requirements.  We plan to continue our sharing of curriculum and approaches with other community colleges around the state, which began in 2011-2012 as part of the first year program review. 

We expect that this work will lead to further curriculum enhancements and specifically, gains in retention and success of students in our Astro 10/20 classes.

-          Continuing our efforts to offer Chabot students and the Community access to the planetarium  with public shows and lectures.   We would like to offer at least (3) public shows every term, and additional events as appropriate (like the 2012 Transit of Venus, and Annular Solar Eclipse public viewing sessions).    The costs of purchasing new shows continues to be prohibitive (~ $6,000 – 8,000 per title), and we must continue to develop our own shows with our limited staff and time to the best of our ability.  We also would like to extend the opportunity to use the planetarium for local elementary and middle schools by acquiring and delivering low-cost school shows.

We expect that these shows will continue to brighten even more the image Chabot College in the minds and hearts of our students and our community, leading to continued interest in attending, continued commitment for retention, and continued student satisfaction at choose Chabot for the educational needs.

Appendix A:  Budget History and Impact

 

 

 

Category

2011-12 Budget Requested

2011-12 Budget Received

2012-13 Budget Requested

2012-13 Budget Received

Classified Staffing (# of positions)

0

0

0

0

Supplies & Services

$1000 Supplies

 

PMA for Planetarium & AV systems covered under original BOND, and was not needed this year

$1000 Supplies

$1000 Supplies

($800 for (2) planetarium lamps)

$6300
Spitz Projector PMA

$9970 Crestron AV PMA

$1000 Supplies


$16,000

PMA’s

Technology/Equipment

0

0

0

0

Other

 

 

$1700

(4)  Additional Planetarium Lamps (from Budget Committee

$1700

(4)  Additional Planetarium Lamps (from Budget Committee

TOTAL

1000

1000

$18,700

$18,700

 

 

1.       How has your investment of the budget monies you did receive improved student learning?  When you requested the funding, you provided a rationale.  In this section, assess if the anticipated positive impacts you projected have, in fact, been realized.

 

Astronomy Budget funds are used to maintain the planetarium and support the Astronomy Lab program.  We offered (4) lab sections serving GE students looking for science lab units required for degree or transfer, and taught all lecture sections (14) in the planetarium, as well as using the facility for physics lectures and discussions.  Students continue to share anecdotally as well as through surveys that learning in the planetarium definitely provides greater stimulation and enjoyment, and we believe that translates to improved student learning.

 

With the funds received, we also were able to offer (5) low-cost public planetarium shows for our community during 2012-13, and free community viewing of two major  Astronomical events (2012 Annular Solar Eclipse, Transit of Venus).    Bringing students and their families, as well as the community, to Chabot also serves our college.

 

 

2.       What has been the impact of not receiving some of your requested funding?  How has student learning been impacted, or safety compromised, or enrollment or retention negatively impacted?

 

Chabot’s new digital planetarium and AV system are much more capable than our old analog system, and with that capability we must face the increase in co-requisite costs for maintenance.  Our old system maintenance agreement for the projector alone was $3500/year (in 2008-2009); the new digital projector system bill is almost twice as much, and the new digital AV system maintenance is an incredible $10K a year (from a current vendor, which we hope to stop using in 2013-2014).

 

We were grateful to receive additional funds for the preventative maintenance agreements, with help from the District (thanks to Jeannine Methe).  Without those funds, we would not have had support for the planetarium AV system repairs to two components, one of which was repaired twice and finally replaced with a new unit.   We made 6 service calls during the academic year, which required significant time diagnosing problems and attempting to create alternatives.

 

Our planetarium’s (6) AV lamps rather unexpectedly reached their  ~1000-hour lifetime threshold all at once, and had to be replaced en-masse.  At more than $800 per set of two, they proved to be much more costly than anticipated even with a small discount through our PMA provider. 

 

The consequences of not being able to receive supply funds for the planetarium and lab class include:

-          Restricting teaching modalities by eliminating dual-projector displays, and multiple-image displays;

-          Restricting lab experiences for students;

-          Under-utilizing the planetarium facility, and not using it for lectures and public shows; and,

-          Requiring lectures to be offered in another venue, and utilizing the planetarium only for teaching of constellations or viewing of special-purpose movies.

We believe the planetarium’s attraction for the student body and the community, and its ability to support relatively large lectures (45+ students at census) generating high WSCH/FTEF values, should continue to justify allocating budget for its maintenance and operations.  Because the new digital systems are more expensive, and we have expanded our data projection capability 3-fold, we do need more funds for lamps and equipment over what had been allocated in years past.  Not receiving those funds will mean not being able to use the planetarium to its fullest for the benefit of our students, and our community.

 

 






Appendix B1:  Course Learning Outcomes Assessment Schedule

 

All courses must be assessed at least once every three years.  Please complete this chart that defines your assessment schedule.

 

All Astronomy Courses have the proper number of CLOs (3 for the lecture classes, 1 for the lab class).  All Astronomy Courses were reviewed in 2011-2012.

 

ASSESSMENT SCHEDULE:

 

Fall  2012

Spring

2013

Fall 2013

Spring

2014

Fall 2014

Spring

2015

Fall
 2015

Spring

2016

Fall 2017

Courses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Astro 30 Lab

 

 

 

 

Full Assmt

Discuss results (already in progress)

Report Results

 

 

 

Full Assmt

Discuss results

Report Results

Astro 10/20 Lectures

 

 

 

 

Full Assmt

Discuss results & report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are participating in a NASA grant with Stanford University in the development of a new astronomy 30 lab using real-time data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and as part of that grant we are expanding our lab curriculum and evaluating it every term.  We are using an amended CLO assessment for the lab evaluation, and are reporting our results to Stanford and NASA.


 

Appendix B2:  “Closing the Loop” Assessment Reflections

 

Course

Astronomy 20

Semester assessment data gathered

Spring 2012

Number of sections offered in the semester

2

Number of sections assessed

2

Percentage of sections assessed

100%

Semester held “Closing the Loop” discussion

Fall 2012

Faculty members involved in “Closing the Loop” discussion

Timothy Dave, Shannon Lee, Scott Hildreth

 

Form Instructions:

  • Part I: CLO Data Reporting.  For each CLO, obtain Class Achievement data in aggregate for all sections assessed in eLumen.   
  • Part II: CLO Reflections.  Based on student success reported in Part I, reflect on the individual CLO.
  • Part III:  Course Reflection.  In reviewing all the CLOs and your findings, reflect on the course as a whole.

 

Part I:  Course-Level Outcomes – Data Results

 

Consider The Course-Level Outcomes Individually (the Number of CLOs will differ by course«)

Defined Target Scores*
(CLO Goal)

Actual Scores** (eLumen data)

Demonstrate an understanding of the reasons for seasons

50% score 3 or 4

36%

Demonstrates understanding of Galileos' Discoveries and why each was important in overthrowing the geocentric model. List of possible answers includes seeing Venus' phase and size changes, seeing Jupiter's 4 moons revolve around Jupiter, seeing Craters and Mountains on the Moon, Sunspots, Saturn's oblong face, distant (and prior, invisible) stars in the Milky Way.

 

 

50% score 3 or 4

 


40%

Critical Thinking - Assignment ASTR 20 - Demonstrate understanding of HR diagram

50% score 3 or 4

40%

Critical Thinking - Assignment ASTR 20 - Demonstrate gain in understanding of key concepts in Astronomy 20 through completion of 28-question multiple choice survey quiz given at least once during the term.

 

50% score 3 or 4


35%

« If more CLOs are listed for the course, add another row to the table.

* Defined Target Scores:  What scores in eLumen from your students would indicate success for this CLO?  (Example:  75% of the class scored either 3 or 4)
**Actual scores: What is the actual percent of students that meet defined target based on the eLumen data collected in this assessment cycle?


 

Part II: Course- level Outcome Reflections

 

  1. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 1:

1.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 

We are below the target goal for students demonstrating an understanding of seasons, based on this CLO and when it is assessed in the class.

 

2.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We use a variety of metrics to assess this CLO, including Mastering Astronomy scores based on an initial homework assignment.  Students may not yet understand the concept at the time of this assessment.    We could consider giving this assessment later in the term, or using a different metric, including essays in a midterm.  Not all faculty use this method, so comparing results might not be effective or reasonable.

 

 

  1. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 2:

1.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 


We are below the target goal for students demonstrating an understanding of Galileo’s work, based on this CLO and when it is assessed in the class.

 

 

2.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We use a variety of metrics to assess this CLO, including Mastering Astronomy scores based on an initial homework assignment.  Students may not yet understand the concept at the time of this assessment.   We could consider giving this assessment later in the term, or using a different metric, including essays in a midterm.  Not all faculty use this method, so comparing results might not be effective or reasonable.

 

 

 


C. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 3:

1.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 

 

We are below the target goal for students demonstrating an understanding of HR diagrams, based on this CLO and when it is assessed in the class.

 

 

2.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We use a variety of metrics to assess this CLO, including Mastering Astronomy scores based on an initial homework assignment.  Students may not yet understand the concept at the time of this assessment.   We could consider giving this assessment later in the term, or using a different metric, including essays in a midterm.  Not all faculty use this method, so comparing results might not be effective or reasonable.

 

 

D. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 4:

1.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 

 

We are below the target goal for students demonstrating an overall understanding of the key concepts in our class, based on this CLO and whether, how, and when it is assessed in the class.

 

 

2.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We need to enable students to do this assessment both on paper and online to add more data for the analysis.  Currently it is deployed online only, at the end of the term, and we are not getting 100% participation from students.  We’ll give the assessment on paper, and collect them for the final exam, in Spring, and see what happens.

 

 

                                                                 

 


Part III: Course Reflections and Future Plans

 

1.       What changes were made to your course based on the previous assessment cycle, the prior Closing the Loop reflections and other faculty discussions? 

 

1)  We continue to use new visual resources in the planetarium to help students both learn the concepts and apply them to current events.

2)  We changed CLO’s after the first few years of trying more complex assessments and finding the eLumen system unworkable. 

 

 

 

2.       Based on the current assessment and reflections, what course-level and programmatic strengths have the assessment reflections revealed?  What actions has your discipline determined might be taken as a result of your reflections, discussions, and insights?

 

We are continuing to discuss what online tool sets make the most sense, and the most positive difference, with our students.  We will continue to investigate how to use those online systems to help us track student success.  In particular, we are continuing to investigate using newer online homework/lecture/discussion portals that offer combined assessment and interaction beyond what Blackboard can do, and different from the current system in use, Mastering Astronomy, supported by the publisher of our primary textbooks.

We still struggle significantly with the CLO process, the difficulty in data entry and inconsistency with the various reporting tools published online.  We would like to make much more fluid changes to our CLOs, but those entries don’t always seem to populate the online system. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.       What is the nature of the planned actions (please check all that apply)?

X Curricular

X Pedagogical

X Resource based

X Change to CLO or rubric

X Change to assessment methods

Appendix B2:  “Closing the Loop” Assessment Reflections

 

Course

Astronomy 30 LAB

Semester assessment data gathered

Spring 2012

Number of sections offered in the semester

2

Number of sections assessed

2

Percentage of sections assessed

100%

Semester held “Closing the Loop” discussion

Fall 2012

Faculty members involved in “Closing the Loop” discussion

Timothy Dave, Shannon Lee, Scott Hildreth

 

Form Instructions:

  • Part I: CLO Data Reporting.  For each CLO, obtain Class Achievement data in aggregate for all sections assessed in eLumen.   
  • Part II: CLO Reflections.  Based on student success reported in Part I, reflect on the individual CLO.
  • Part III:  Course Reflection.  In reviewing all the CLOs and your findings, reflect on the course as a whole.

 

Part I:  Course-Level Outcomes – Data Results

 

Consider The Course-Level Outcomes Individually (the Number of CLOs will differ by course«)

Defined Target Scores*
(CLO Goal)

Actual Scores** (eLumen data)

Demonstrate an understanding of the difference between precision and accuracy through a lab report or capstone survey

50% score 3 or 4

66%

Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of angular size and resolution with telescopes through a lab activity, write-up, project, or hands-on demonstration using a telescope

 

 

50% score 3 or 4

 


66%

« If more CLOs are listed for the course, add another row to the table.

* Defined Target Scores:  What scores in eLumen from your students would indicate success for this CLO?  (Example:  75% of the class scored either 3 or 4)
**Actual scores: What is the actual percent of students that meet defined target based on the eLumen data collected in this assessment cycle?


 

Part II: Course- level Outcome Reflections

 

  1. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 1:

3.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 

We are above the target goal for students demonstrating an understanding of precision and accuracy, based on this CLO and when it is assessed in the class.

 

4.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We will continue to stress the difference between the two concepts, and illustrate that difference in every lab.

 

 

  1. Course-Level Outcome (CLO) 2:

3.       How do your current scores match with your above target for student success in this course level outcome?

 


We are above the target goal for students demonstrating an understanding of angular size, resolution with telescopes, based on this CLO and when it is assessed in the class.

 

 

4.       Reflection:  Based on the data gathered, and considering your teaching experiences and your discussions with other faculty, what reflections and insights do you have?

 

 

We will continue to find new ways to work on, and practice with, the concepts of angular size, angular resolution, and construction of telescopes to maximize that resolution.

 

 

 

 


Part III: Course Reflections and Future Plans

 

4.       What changes were made to your course based on the previous assessment cycle, the prior Closing the Loop reflections and other faculty discussions? 

 

1)  We are adding a new lab activity based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory Data.

2)  We changed CLO’s after the first few years of trying more complex assessments and finding the eLumen system problematic. 

 

 

 

5.       Based on the current assessment and reflections, what course-level and programmatic strengths have the assessment reflections revealed?  What actions has your discipline determined might be taken as a result of your reflections, discussions, and insights?

 

Students are getting the ideas presented, as we stress their application in multiple labs across the curriculum rather than in just one particular exercise on one night.  Our new SDO lab has been field testing in both sections in Fall 2012, and with adjustments will be tried again in Spring 2013.  We will assess that new lab in the next round, as well as look at changing or adding CLOs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.       What is the nature of the planned actions (please check all that apply)?

X Curricular

X Pedagogical

X Resource based

X Change to CLO or rubric

X Change to assessment methods

 


 

Appendix C:  Program Learning Outcomes

Considering your feedback, findings, and/or information that has arisen from the course level discussions, please reflect on each of your Program Level Outcomes.

 

Program: Astronomy Lecture Courses for GE Physical Science Students

(Note – this is not a program per se, because students typically take only one lecture course, not a sequence of courses.  We have chosen to look at the “Program” as more general goals for student learning in either lecture course, over and above specific concept-related CLOs)

·         PLO #1:

Students will be able to explain key principles of astronomy using applicable vocabulary; including employing the scientific method to organize, prioritize, and problem solve. Astronomy (10, 20)

 

·         PLO #2:

Students will explain how and where the human species fits into the immense, complex and ever-changing universe. Astronomy (10, 20)

 

 

What questions or investigations arose as a result of these reflections or discussions?


We are investigating how to use multi-media resources and online course tools to address these PLOs.  One faculty member is “flipping” the classroom with extensive video clips made available outside of lecture, delivered through a new online tool.  One faculty member is utilizing an online homework/media tool with lined YouTube clips to encourage student application and extension.

 

 

What program-level strengths have the assessment reflections revealed?


The planetarium as a visual theater with immersive 3D capabilities is a resource that still needs to be utilized even more.

 

 

What actions has your discipline determined might be taken to enhance the learning of students completing your program?

Actions planned:  We want to solicit more funds to enable purchase of 3D movies for the Spitz projector that will benefit our students by offering immersive visual learning experiences.  We will also continue to investigate new online content delivery systems.

 

 


Program:
Astronomy 30 Lab Course for GE Physical Science Students

·         PLO #1:  Students will be able to explain key principles of observational and theoretical astronomy using applicable vocabulary and relating them to hands-on laboratory activities; including employing the scientific method to organize, prioritize, and problem solve.


 

What questions or investigations arose as a result of these reflections or discussions?


We want to give our students even greater opportunities to do real science with real data, rather than just do pre-planned activities that represent the process of science.

 

 

What program-level strengths have the assessment reflections revealed?


We have connections with Stanford and NASA that  are enabling the creation of new labs utilizing real-time data and opportunities for students to create their own investigations.

 

 

What actions has your discipline determined might be taken to enhance the learning of students completing your program?


1) Continue to develop and publish the SDO lab activities.

2) Continue to investigate access and use of robotic telescopes.

3) Continue to push for a roof-top observatory location on campus so that students might do actual  data collection in the lab.

 

 


 

Appendix D:  A Few Questions

 

Please answer the following questions with "yes" or "no".  For any questions answered "no", please provide an explanation.  No explanation is required for "yes" answers :-)

 

1.       Have all of your course outlines been updated within the past five years?   If no, identify the course outlines you will update in the next curriculum cycle.  Ed Code requires all course outlines to be updated every six years.


YES.  (Revised course outlines were submitted in Fall 2012 for all 3 courses; they do not as yet show up in the current curriculum list).

2.       Have all of your courses been offered within the past five years?  If no, why should those courses remain in our college catalog?

YES

 

3.       Do all of your courses have the required number of CLOs completed, with corresponding rubrics?  If no, identify the CLO work you still need to complete, and your timeline for completing that work this semester.

YES (even though some of the campus reports seem to indicate otherwise, we have 4 CLO’s for the 3-unit lecture classes, and 2 CLOS’s for the lab class.

 

4.       Have you assessed all of your courses and completed "closing the loop" forms for all of your courses within the past three years?  If no, identify which courses still require this work, and your timeline for completing that work this semester.

YES – but some of that data doesn’t appear saved online by eLumen.  We need to re-enter it or submit it again.

 

5.       Have you developed and assessed PLOs for all of your programs?  If no, identify programs which still require this work, and your timeline to complete that work this semester.

YES

 

6.       If you have course sequences, is success in the first course a good predictor of success in the subsequent course(s)?

N/A but we continue to find that students taking the lab class alongside the lecture do better in the lecture class by ½ of a grade.

 

7.       Does successful completion of College-level Math and/or English correlate positively with success in your courses?  If not, explain why you think this may be.

YES – and especially so with English in our lecture classes.


 

Appendix E:  Proposal for New Initiatives:

Learn About the Stars - and Science - at Chabot College!

Establishing grade-level appropriate planetarium shows for elementary and middle-school students in the Chabot College Community.

 

 

 

Description:  Fund the acquisition and delivery of 2-3 grade-level appropriate school shows for our full-dome planetarium that can be shown to students in grades 1-2, 3-5, and 6-9 from local schools in our service area. 


Background: Chabot College used to have the budget and reassignment time for faculty to develop and delivery low-cost planetarium shows for local schools.  Over time, that budget and time has been cut due to necessity, leaving our planetarium less accessible to our community, and unable to help in the development of interest in younger students in STEM disciplines.  Developing grade-level specific shows, and delivering them with quality, takes significant time, and acquisition of the full-dome features that can be shown with our equipment is expensive.  We cannot charge local schools for the costs of developing those programs, and even charging a nominal fee per student ($2-5 each is typical), and offering 1-2 shows a month, we could not recoup the costs over 10 years of shows.

How does your initiative address the college's Strategic Plan goal, or significantly improve student learning?   


We recognize that, in the short term, offering school shows to local students will not directly increase the number of students looking to meet their educational goals at Chabot.  Nevertheless, offering public planetarium shows for local schools increases the positive impact we offer in the community, and in the long term, can lead to future enrollment interest.  Even more important, though, is the idea of opening up our campus to young students in our community also plants a seed that can eventually grow into the desire and confidence for those same students to attend college, perhaps at Chabot itself.  With so many of our students coming from households where they are the first family member to attend college, it is clear that anything we can do to help our community come to understand and appreciate what a community college can offer is important work.

On a much smaller scale, we recognize that offering shows also may give us the chance to recruit selected students interested in “internships” as planetarium and science educators, assisting us in the development and delivery of the content.

We recognize that the current limited budget climate may not support this initiative at this time, but want to put out for consideration and reflection that – if funding might be found, through foundation support or other educational grants – the Chabot College Planetarium can play a very important role in attracting students and the community to our campus, and further demonstrating our value in that community as an educational institutions for all.




 

What is your specific goal and measurable outcome? 

 

Find the funds to purchase, and deliver, grade-level appropriate full-dome shows for grades 3-5, 6-9, and then 1-2.  Advertise the shows with local schools, and test their response. 

 

 

What is your action plan to achieve your goal?

 

Activity (brief description)

Target Completion Date

Required Budget (Split out personnel, supplies, other categories)

Find funding for the first show

Spring 2013

~$8,000 for show costs

Develop initial show, advertise with local teachers in specific grades, and deliver (~6 shows per term, 2 per month initially)

Recruit additional students interested in helping.  Expand adjunct faculty opportunities to lead the shows.

Fall 2013 – Spring 2014

~$4,000 for personnel time and materials costs

Find funding for additional shows

Spring 2014

~$8,000 - $16,000

Create and deliver additional school shows

Fall 2014-Spring 2015

~$5000 for personnel time

 

How will you manage the personnel needs?

New Hires:                   X    Classified staff  # of positions  1, part-time

Reassigning existing employee(s) to the project; employee(s) current workload will be:

       
X     Covered by overload or part-time employee(s)

                                               

 

At the end of the project period, the proposed project will:

                                                X     Be completed (onetime only effort);

(Once purchased, the shows become the property of Chabot College, and can be reused for future years.)

                                               

 

Will the proposed project require facility modifications, additional space, or program relocation?

X     No                 

Will the proposed project involve subcontractors, collaborative partners, or cooperative agreements?


X  Possibly, if we can find funding partners

 

Do you know of any grant funding sources that would meet the needs of the proposed project?

X     Not at the present time.


Appendix F3:  FTEF Requests

 

Audience: Administrators, CEMC, PRBC

Purpose: To recommend changes in FTEF allocations for subsequent academic year and guide Deans and CEMC in the allocation of FTEF to disciplines. For more information, see Article 29 (CEMC) of the Faculty Contract.

Instructions: In the area below, please list your requested changes in course offerings (and corresponding request in FTEF) and provide your rationale for these changes. Be sure to analyze enrollment trends and other relevant data at http://www.chabotcollege.edu/ProgramReview/Data2012.cfm .

 

 


We request an additional 1.20 FTEF for Astronomy for 2013-2014, allowing us to offer three additional sections (3 units, 0.20 FTEF each) for each term. 

This would allow for a full schedule of 8 lecture
sections each term over the existing 5 lecture sections.  As our classes typically run at more than 100% fill rate, and generate more than 660 WSCH/FTEF, the additional FTEF would be a proven and highly efficient means for Chabot to achieve its growth targets for the future.  And since the Astronomy 10/20 courses help our GE students with their degree and transfer plans, the additional sections are in complete support of our college’s single goal.

 

Rationale:

In prior years, we ran 7-8 lecture sections of Astronomy 10 and 20, with excellent fill rates and very high WSCH/FTEF generation.  Because of budget limitations and restrictions in FTEF, we began cutting astronomy sections in 2009 so that we could continue to offer a complete program in Physics.    We are currently down to just 5 lecture sections per term, and just 1 in summer.

In response to the need for additional FTES for Spring 2013, we were able to add (3) sections of Astronomy 10/20 lecture courses to complement the (5) sections already scheduled.   All filled quickly, demonstrating that there is demand for additional GE offerings in the physical sciences. 

We wanted to maximize student access with the additional sections, and scheduled a late afternoon MW class, an evening W class, and an online section.  That all filled, and did not take away from enrollment in the typical MW and TTh morning and early afternoon sections, further demonstrates that GE students apparently need accessible options in terms of their schedules.  If we do intend to increase the number of students meeting their goals, we need to recognize that many of our students need access to their required classes outside of the traditional times.  To help them, we need a larger FTEF allocation.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Appendix F5:  Supplies & Services Requests [Acct. Category 4000 and 5000]

 

Audience: Administrators, Budget Committee, PRBC

Purpose: To request funding for supplies and service, and to guide the Budget Committee in allocation of funds.

Instructions: In the area below, please list both your current and requested budgets for categories 4000 and 5000 in priority order.  Do NOT include conferences and travel, which are submitted on Appendix M6.   Justify your request and explain in detail any requested funds beyond those you received this year.  Please also look for opportunities to reduce spending, as funds are very limited.

 

 

2012-13 Budget

 

 

Project or Items Requested

Requested

Received

2013-14 Request

Rationale

Astronomy Program, Lab & Planetarium Supplies (Markers, lightbulbs, measuring tape, videos, lasers, pointers, toner, paper, software, etc.)

$1000

1000

$1000

The planetarium is not a typical classroom; lighting and other equipment is not supported by standard campus classroom accounts. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix F6:  Conference and Travel Requests [ Acct. Category 5000]

 

Audience: Staff Development Committee, Administrators, Budget Committee, PRBC

Purpose: To request funding for conference attendance, and to guide the Budget and Staff Development Committees in allocation of funds.

Instructions: Please list specific conferences/training programs, including specific information on the name of the conference and location.  Note that the Staff Development Committee currently has no budget, so this data is primarily intended to identify areas of need that could perhaps be fulfilled on campus, and to establish a historical record of need.  Your rationale should discuss student learning goals and/or connection to the Strategic Plan goal.

 

Conference/Training Program

2013-14 Request

Rationale

Astronomical Society of the Pacific – Cosmos in the Classroom  ( San Jose, CA: July 2013)

$300 for one faculty member

Every 3 years, the ASP holds a national conference about the teaching of astronomy for community college and university faculty.  Attended by well over 200 faculty, the conferences offer chances to learn and share with colleagues teaching introductory astronomy lecture and lab classes identical to those we offer at Chabot. Expected topics include student learning outcomes, increasing student success with online resources, developing new science labs, and more – all topics that are part of our program review goals.

Spitz Summer Institute, (Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania: August 2013)

$525 for 5-day session, plus travel

Our planetarium projector and software control systems were provided by Spitz, an international leader in planetarium equipment.  To full develop our system, and take advantage of its capabilities for public shows as well as for integrated curriculum, we need training.  The Spitz Institute provides hands-on training for planetarium  professionals looking to create course material, and learn how to utilize existing equipment to improve student learning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix F7: Technology and Other Equipment Requests [Acct. Category 6000]

                       

Audience: Budget Committee, Technology Committee, Administrators

Purpose: To be read and responded to by Budget Committee and to inform priorities of the Technology Committee.

Instructions: Please fill in the following as needed to justify your requests. If you're requesting classroom technology, see http://www.chabotcollege.edu/audiovisual/Chabot%20College%20Standard.pdf for the brands/model numbers that are our current standards.  If requesting multiple pieces of equipment, please rank order those requests.  Include shipping cost and taxes in your request.

 

Please note:  Equipment requests are for equipment whose unit cost exceeds $200.  Items which are less expensive should be requested as supplies.  Software licenses should also be requested as supplies.

 

 

2012-13 Budget

 

 

Project or Items Requested

Requested

Received

2013-14 Request

Rationale*

Planetarium  Data Projector Bulbs

$1700

$1700

$1800

We found that the Panasonic Data Projectors that had been installed had lamp useful lives less than ½ of what was anticipated because of how the installer (Spinitar) and the contractor had designed the system – so that even if a projector lamp is not being used, but the system is still powered on, the lamp life is decreased.  This means that the (6) lamps supporting the (3) data projectors must be replaced more often.  We also found that less expensive non-OEM bulbs did not work, and we were forced to purchase new lamps.  We received a small discount from Spintar when they were our maintenance contractor, but we are not using them any longer, and we’ll have to pay ~$800/pair for the lamps.  Purchasing an additional set of 4 lamps will give us the ability to back up the current projectors, and if necessary, go to a 2-projector system (currently used in our pedagogy).  If one or two lamps fail now, we will completely lose one data projector.


 

Appendix F8: Facilities Requests

                       

Audience: Facilities Committee, Administrators

Purpose: To be read and responded to by Facilities Committee.

Background:  Following the completion of the 2012 Chabot College Facility Master Plan, the Facilities Committee (FC) has begun the task of re-prioritizing Measure B Bond budgets to better align with current needs. The FC has identified approximately $18M in budgets to be used to meet capital improvement needs on the Chabot College campus. Discussion in the FC includes holding some funds for a year or two to be used as match if and when the State again funds capital projects, and to fund smaller projects that will directly assist our strategic goal. The FC has determined that although some of the college's greatest needs involving new facilities cannot be met with this limited amount of funding, there are many smaller pressing needs that could be addressed. The kinds of projects that can be legally funded with bond dollars include the "repairing, constructing, acquiring, equipping of classrooms, labs, sites and facilities."  Do NOT use this form for equipment or supply requests.
Instructions: Please fill in the following as needed to justify your requests. If requesting more than one facilities project, please rank order your requests.

 

Brief Title of Request (Project Name): Roof-Top Observatory for Chabot College

 

Building/Location: Any new or retrofitted building could serve

 

Description of the facility project.  Please be as specific as possible.

 

For more than 20 years, we have requested through BCPs and other means the opportunity to create a small observing platform atop a building on campus, so that students could do real science using telescopes.  In those years, with new buildings constructed, and improvements in campus lighting and safety, the at-ground-level space available for using our existing telescopes as shrunk to an almost unusable extent.  When we requested the opportunity to put the observatory atop the renovated buildings 1900, 1800, and 1700, we were informed that it could not be done because of the need for safe student access to the roof, requiring additional seismic reviews and upgrades to the buildings that would prove too costly, including elevators to support disabled student/faculty access.

The last BCP we put through requesting this same rooftop access was with Building 1600, but renovation of that building was contingent upon state funds that do not appear to be forthcoming. 

If another new building is built on campus, anywhere, or if one is renovated and in doing so, can be retrofitted with an accessible rooftop surface, we would like to establish the opportunity to house a small observation dome (already purchased), on top of a rooftop pad that would support 25 students in a space about 20’ x 25’ or more.  We need power and lighting, data connections and wireless data support, appropriate safety rails, and access through secure stairways from a lower floor, as well as some sort of lift or elevator. We could use the plans developed for Building 1600 as a template for what is required.



What educational programs or institutional purposes does this equipment support?


The rooftop observation platform would dramatically improve the instruction offered in our Astronomy 30 lab class – one of the only 1-unit science labs that can be taken to fulfill degree and transfer requirements.  Incorporating actual science into the science lab curriculum through direct observation is something done already at nearby community colleges, including Las Positas College, the College of San Mateo, Foothill College, and many more.


 

 


Briefly describe how your request relates specifically to meeting the Strategic Plan Goal and to enhancing student learning?


Better lab facilities leads to improvements in student learning, and the opportunity to offer additional sections to increase the number of students we serve.  Satisfying GE, CSU, and IGETC requirements for science labs is something that many of our students must do to be successful with their education plans.  Astronomy 30 is one of the key courses that helps a large number of students with that goal.