http://www.chabotcollege.edu/faculty/shildreth/astronomy/stars.html

Chabot College - Introduction to Astronomy - Scott Hildreth

Constellations and Stars for the On-campus Quiz


Note that many of these images are linked on the wonderful constellation image pages of Naoyuki Kurita, copyright 2006, 
available at http://www.ne.jp/asahi/stellar/scenes/english/seiza.htm.  Additional help on stars, constellations, and planets 
can be found online at many sites.  Check out STARDATE (from the McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas) and Skymaps, 
by Kym Thalassoudis. Questions/Comments? email me!   

 
Winter Skies

 

 Constellations  Brightest Stars

 Study Hints

 
Orion
 
Betelgeuse & Rigel
Set your sky chart for 9 PM mid-February to see these stars high in the sky, near the meridian line.

Start by finding Orion, and note the pattern of bright stars makes up what is known as the "winter football" or "winter diamond."

Canis Major (Large Dog)
 
Sirius
 
Canis Minor (Small Dog)
 
Procyon

Gemini (the Twins)
 
Pollux & Castor

Auriga
 
Capella
 
Taurus the Bull
 
Aldebaran



Spring Skies
 Constellations  Brightest Stars

 Study Hints


Looking South
 
 Set your sky chart for 9 PM mid-May to see these stars high in the sky, near the meridian line.

Leo the Lion
 
Regulus

Cancer the Crab
 
(no bright stars to identify)

Virgo the Maiden
 
Spica

Corvus the Crow
 
(no bright stars to identify)

Looking
North
 
Ursa Major
(Big Dipper)
Dubhe & Merak

 the pointer stars


Ursa Minor (Little Dipper)
 
Polaris

Also, Pherkad and Kochab


Bootes
 
Arcturus
Corona Borealis Alphecca (Gemma)

Not labeled on the star locator, but if you click on the link to the left, you'll see the Corona Borealis constellation, and Alphekka is the brightest star in that group.




Summer Skies
 Constellations  Brightest Stars to Know

 Study Hints


Lyra the Lyre
 
Vega

 

The first three constellations make up the summer triangle,  which is actually visible for almost 6 months through all of summer and autumn as well.

Set your sky chart for 9 PM mid-August to see most of these stars high in the sky, near the meridian line. Scorpius and Sagittarius are low in the south.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cygnus the Swan
 
Deneb

Aquila the Eagle
 
Altair

Hercules
 
(no bright stars to identify)

Scorpius
 
Antares & Shaula

(Shaula is not on the star wheel, but is easily found as the brightest star at the end of the Scorpion's tail.)
 

Libra
 

Zubenelgenubi  &

Zubeneschamali

(These are not labeled on the star wheel, but they are the two brightest stars just to the "right" of Scorpius' head.  Their names mean "the northern (or southern) claw of the scorpion"


Sagittarius the Archer
 
Nunki




Autumn Skies

 Constellations  Brightest Stars

 Study Hints


Pegasus the Flying Horse
 
Alpheratz (not labeled on the star locator, but visible in this image and in Andromeda
 Set your sky chart for 9 PM mid-November to see these stars high in the sky, near the meridian line.

Pisces the Fish
 
(no bright stars to identify)

Aries the Ram
 
 Hamal & Sheratan

Andromeda the Daughter
 
(M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, is visible in the image as a bright and fuzzy patch)

Cassiopeia the Queen
 
Caph and Schedar
Cepheus the King
Alderamin

 


Perseus the Hero
 
(no bright stars to identify)

Perseus does arc towards the Pleiades star cluster!