Chabot College

Tegrity Lecture Capture Pilot Project Summary

June 2009


 

 

In February 2009, Chabot College was offered the chance for up to five faculty colleagues to try out the Tegrity (www.tegrity.com) software-based lecture capture system, for free, with unlimited ‘hosting’ of lectures that were recorded and uploaded, and unlimited access by our students to that material.  With the help of the college’s Committee On Online Learning, its chair Jan Novak, and Tom Clark, Dean of Applied Technology and Business, we were able to take advantage of the opportunity, and try out the system. 

 

Between the participants, we recorded almost 30 hours of live lectures from 58 different class sections in 10 different courses.  More than 100 students accessed the lectures and provided useful feedback.  We recorded lectures with PowerPoint slides accompanied by audio narration, as well as lectures using whiteboards.  A shared demonstration access area was set up for colleagues at Chabot to check out some of the recorded lectures at:

 

http://hera-chabot.tegrity.com                userid: chabot              password: tegrity

 

Through the pilot, we learned a great deal about how lecture capture could work at Chabot, and definitely gained valuable experience within our own classrooms about audio, video, and effectively imaging chalkboard/whiteboard work for later viewing on a computer screen.  Students in the pilot courses had the chance to look at their lectures, and uniformly expressed the thought that a lecture capture system, in place at the start of a term, could be of significant help in their learning.  They felt such a system would given them a way to see and hear lectures again after class, to assist with their studying, and give them a “safety net” were they to miss class. 

 

What is Tegrity?

 

Tegrity runs on a PC or Mac in a classroom as an application; anything that can be shown on the computer (PowerPoint slides, webpages, simulations, etc.) and any audio or video source attached to the computer in a lecture is automatically recorded, bundled, uploaded to an external server, and made available online to students for viewing and searching from any computer, anywhere, anytime after the lecture.  Recording lectures requires the downloading of a special application that self-installed in less than a minute; viewing lectures required students to download a similar free web application to their preferred computer.

 

Unlike YouTube videos that are uploaded and made available in the public domain, Tegrity recordings are kept on a private server. Students access the recordings online, usually using their “W” numbers for a userid and a password, although these could be set to any values we desired.  Student access was logged by userid, and made available via easy-to-create reports.

 

There are other lecture capture systems available in the marketplace, some requiring additional specialized hardware, and some requiring streaming servers already in place within a campus’ computing network.  Tegrity offers hosting services which meant that we could try their software without requiring any network equipment, upgrades, or support.

 

What was the Pilot Project Designed to Do?

 

Chabot College does not currently have a streaming server to support faculty who want to capture their lecture audio, video, or both.  And there are very few faculty annotating PowerPoint presentations, or creating audio podcasts or visual vodcasts of their lectures.  Many of the software tools available to do these things are complex. Tegrity’s system is marketed as one of the easiest to use, requiring very little training.  And so we wanted to explore whether the technology was indeed easy enough for faculty to use without technical support required to be present in the classroom while lectures took place, and whether the technology was easy enough for students to access 24/7.  We wanted to explore what quality of recording was possible, and whether it would be effective for student review.  We also wanted to explore whether anything might be learned from students’ accessing the recorded lectures, although we recognized that starting mid-term meant that we really couldn’t address questions of student retention and success. 

 

 

Who Participated in the Tegrity Pilot?

 

After putting out a general note to all Chabot Faculty soliciting interest, we received a dozen responses, from which five faculty were initially selected to participate:

 

Trish Shannon (Philosophy 50)

Veronica Martinez (Speech 1/3/10

Ashley Long (Machine Tool Technology – Numerical Control 1 & Solid Modeling)

Wanda Wong (Business 1A, Computer Science 14)

Cedric Pounds (Digital Media 36B)

 

Scott Hildreth served as pilot project coordinator, and also recorded lectures in Astronomy 10 and Physics 4C.   

 

 

What did the Pilot Project Require of Chabot?

 

To participate in the free Tegrity Pilot, Chabot College agreed to train and support the five faculty colleagues locally, hold meetings with Tegrity, and administer faculty and student surveys at the completion of the project.  There was no obligation to purchase Tegrity’s system at the conclusion of the trial. 

 

Because the Tegrity system is software based, we could use it on existing laptop and smart classroom computers.  One pilot participant used a laptop shared within her division, one used a laptop loaned to the project from Media Services, and one used a personal laptop. Additional hardware for the pilot project (6 wireless USB microphones and 5 webcams) cost $1800; these were general purpose equipment and are now available for use by faculty for other applications.  Stipends for participating faculty, underwritten by the COOL committee, totaled $2000. 

 

From March through May, participants met five times to be trained, and to discuss progress, share ideas, and collaborate.

 

What did we learn about setting up a lecture capture system at Chabot?

 

As with almost any technology, successful implementation requires planning and teamwork.  The pilot would not have happened without the help of many colleagues across the institution.  Once it was decided that this project was something worth pursuing, we had to discuss, review, and sign the pilot contract, requiring conversations with campus administration.  Vice President Gene Groppetti was extremely supportive and encouraged the innovation.  We had to research, order and receive necessary equipment in two weeks, which was facilitated wonderfully by Jan Novak and Tom Clark.  Because the equipment was attaching to computers in smart classrooms, we needed to coordinate with Media Services as well as Chabot’s Computer Support Team.  Because the application involved network traffic implications, we needed to involve the District’s IT group.

 

We also had to establish whether the rooms each faculty member was teaching within were wired to the internet, and whether the computers present in faculty offices and affected classrooms were capable of running Tegrity software.  Downloading the software required administrator privileges that campus faculty do not have, necessitating Computer Support’s help.  In at least two cases, office and room computers needed video driver updates.   In the case of Trish Shannon’s Philosophy 50 class, taught in the Little Theater using a computer shared within the Fine Arts Division, the logistics of setup and takedown of the equipment required additional time and support from Kari McAllister.  And since the computer was not able to be left connected to the web after the lecture, and no campus wireless network exists within the division office, lectures could not automatically be uploaded. 

 

As is typical for projects that get started late, we struggled finding common times to meet, and finding time to devote to trying the system in our classrooms.  Our adjunct colleague in the pilot, Cedric Pounds, wasn’t able to attend on-campus meetings with the rest of the team, and ultimately was not able to give the system a real try in his class, much as he wanted to do so.  This points to the difficulty we often face leveraging technology with faculty who are not full-time.

 

What did we learn about Tegrity and Lecture Capture?

 

The Tegrity system was indeed very easy to use – with minimal training (one demonstration, some individual hands-on training, and personal exploration time) we were able to capture lectures on our computers with confidence.  And students could access the lectures 24/7 as promised.  A few students reported problems with the installation of a plug-in that was required for their browsers, and some reported problems with particular browsers (like Firefox).  But after a few trials, faculty were able to plug in the microphone, start the recorder, click on the “GO” button, and lecture.

 

Tegrity’s support during the trial was very good – training on how to setup the system was fast and easy, phone and email questions were answered immediately, and they clearly showed an interest in making Chabot successful.  Software glitches that occurred were researched and quickly resolved, and alternative approaches identified.

 

Setting up the Tegrity system for faculty and student access was very straightforward, requiring one administrator to enter in course names, user names, and passwords, and then cross-referencing users to the courses.  All of this was done with a simple Excel spreadsheet which could be maintained and uploaded anytime, from anywhere, making changes very easy to accomplish. (And were the campus to opt for a full-scale implementation of Tegrity, students and courses could be automatically loaded into the system from Banner.

What were Tegrity’s Strengths and Limitations?

 

Tegrity’s strengths were its ability to capture audio narration of PowerPoint or Web-based lecture presentations, its ease of use, and its ability to offer hosting and access to our students without any institutional servers or network support.  Once recorded, an audio/computer-screen presentation could be uploaded quickly (e.g. 30+ minute PowerPoint/Web lectures enhanced with audio uploaded from a classroom to the Tegrity server in 5-10 minutes on the campus network).  These types of lectures were automatically indexed by Tegrity, allowing users to skip to any slide within a presentation, and to search on terms that appear as text within the presentation.  Students could search on a key term that might have been used on a slide or in a webpage, as long as the term was indeed text, and find every occurrence of that term in the lecture on any and all slides, and then with one click they could access that particular slide. 

 

Tegrity’s limitations were mostly related to video.  The standard Tegrity recording interface provides one larger viewing window for the computer screen image (PowerPoint or web application) and one “picture-in-picture” window which could be a static image, or a webcam image of the lecturer talking while the slides were advanced. When instructors wanted to shift from PowerPoint mode to a webcamera, the camera window could not be made larger without stopping the recording and starting another session.  If instead the instructor wanted to maximize the camera window, then the PowerPoint slides could not be seen.  It was an either-or choice, rather than providing the flexibility for a user to decide during the lecture which screen – computer or camera – should be larger.

 

The webcams were very good for individual face close-up shots, which could be used by faculty to record while in their offices or at home.  But they simply were inadequate to capture details written on the chalkboards.  And “pixilation” became distracting when small-window video was maximized to the large screen size.

 

To effectively capture chalkboard or whiteboard work requires a higher-resolution camera placed optimally in the room – webcams were just not good enough, even though we purchased high-resolution face-following cameras.  Attempting to capture equations or drawings on white boards was challenging with the webcams given the reflectivity of the boards and room lighting, requiring tinkering with white balance, contrast, and auto-focus settings.

 

But setting up better camcorders with tripods before a lecture, and connecting them to the computer, getting the system primed to record, and audio levels checked - and then taking everything apart after the lecture, is more than most faculty can reasonably do.  And there were some difficulties identifying what specific types of cameras would work with the Tegrity recorder software, requiring quite a bit of trial and error on the part of two of us until we found some that worked.

 

The USB wireless microphones were easy to install and produced fair sound quality if held at the right distance and not left in a pocket, and if turned on when the lecture started.  They could not capture student comments from elsewhere in a room.  A directional room microphone should be considered for classes where significant student interaction needs to be captured.

 

A more complete list of strengths and limitations of the Tegrity system are attached after the conclusion of this report.

 

 

What did we not get a chance to explore?

 

Tegrity has many significant features we didn’t fully exercise, including tracking student usage and tying that to performance on assessment, and recording student videos for uploading and review by the rest of the class.   We were not able to use the system long enough to see whether students who used it did better on exams.  Only one or two student videos were recorded.  The Tegrity playback feature allows users to slow down or speed up the accompanying audio stream in a lecture, and we weren’t able to survey whether this was a feature students might appreciate – especially those for whom English is not their native language. 

 

What did the students say?

 

The most obvious student comments that ran through all of the responses collected was that students wished they could have used the technology from the beginning of the class, rather than starting as we did in April.  We did not have adequate time to really address whether recording the lectures would change student study habits, would lead to better success on exams, or would lead to improved retention.  The survey responses received were almost unanimous in recommending that the lecture capture idea was one we should promote; most students cited the idea that they could miss a lecture and be able to catch up, or review a lecture to catch what they missed or possibly didn’t understand.  Most students who did respond reported the software to be easy to use, with only a few students sharing that they could not

 

Summaries of student comments are attached in the appendix; the survey instrument was provided by Tegrity.  Although we could have designed our own, in the interest of time we decided to use what was available.

 

What did the faculty say about how lecture capture could benefit Chabot’s students?

 

Participants liked the idea of lecture capture very much.  We feel it has potential to help many of our students significantly, in many distinct ways:

 

-         Capturing lectures provides students who were in attendance the chance to review key concepts anytime, anywhere after class.

-         Capturing audio can significantly enrich the learning experience for students who might not understand or process information spoken by their professors as quickly as we sometimes delivery that information.

-         Capturing lectures provides conscientious students convenient access to their class without interruption when they must miss class because of work, family, or other personal reasons. 

-         Capturing lectures can help students who don’t write quickly in class, or find themselves unable to take notes effectively, or prefer to listen attentively rather than attempt to listen and take notes simultaneously.

 

 

 

 

What should we take away from the trial?

 

Institutional coordination for technology implementation is once more shown as absolutely crucial to our success.  This was an extremely easy to use software-based system – and we still needed to involve quite a few players.  Were we to try to ramp up usage from just 5 colleagues and a handful of classes to perhaps 50 colleagues, touching perhaps 100-150 courses, 2500-5000 students, and 500 FTES, significant ongoing training and faculty support from our ITC, Media Services, and Campus Computer support teams would be required.   While not at all as complex as Blackboard, lecture capture will still be an application that requires more than just faculty and computers to make it work, and work well enough for students to really benefit.

 

Ease of use will be paramount with any system we might decide to pursue – unless we will be willing to spend much more money supporting faculty with dedicated staff who could setup and take down equipment before and after class. 

 

Quality for some lecture capture applications involving chalkboards or whiteboards will be an issue. One way to explore this further would be to equip at least one or two lecture rooms on campus with higher-quality cameras pre-wired to room computers, and pre-configured room microphones – in essence creating “super-smart” classrooms.   Other institutions do this already, and there are hardware based room lecture capture systems available in the market that take exactly this approach.  CSUEB uses one system (Echo), and it offers some definite advantages, although setup, maintenance, and processing of the captured lecture requires more in the way of staff time than we might be able to afford.

 

 

How should we proceed?

 

Before we can say that any lecture capture system would possibly improve student retention and success, it is clear that we need to test it for at least one semester, offering faculty training before the term starts, outfitting all rooms and offices with hardware and software before the term stars, and offering students the chance to use the system from the outset of the class. 

 

Had we been able to use Tegrity’s system in this way, we might be in a much better position to say that continuing with their solution would be the best course.  Tegrity does offer a one-year trial, for up to 15 faculty, again externally hosting and serving all content to all students 24/7, for a $25,000 fee – and that is one option we could consider to generate more input on student usage.  Before we might really take advantage of Tegrity’s particular strengths, though, we would need a larger critical mass of faculty teaching with PowerPoint or Web-based lectures, who want to capture their audio presentation to complement the computer screen images and words.  And given how few classrooms are equipped with capable projectors and computers on campus, it is not clear whether we have that large a base of faculty users.

 

There are numerous other commercial lecture capture systems designed for education that we could consider, some with external hosting options, and some requiring local streaming server hosting.  Additionally, we could explore low-cost or free hosting services, such as those provided by Palomar Community College, coupled with software and local support. The new iTunes University agreement is another option to be considered, as that offers another way to make content recorded in a classroom available to students, but doesn’t dictate how that content is to be recorded.

A group of faculty and ITC staff have been exploring these options in parallel with the Tegrity pilot over the last two months, and we are considering how Chabot College might explore one or more technologies through Title III funding for pilots.  But because lecture capture systems involve computers, software, offices, lecture rooms, and the campus network, successful exploration and eventual wider integration of the technology to many faculty necessarily must include active participation by our computer support, media services, and District IT teams.

 

One approach we might consider immediately to continue the momentum built by our pilot project would be to look at all of the faculty scheduled to teach in the Technology-Enabled Classrooms (our so-called “smart” rooms), during 2009-2010, and survey them to see how many are indeed using the computer and projection systems as their primary means of lecture delivery.  With that group as a potential pilot user base, we could consider how to encourage individual solutions (with faculty purchasing their own lecture capture server space provided by external vendors) and institutional solutions (through iTunes U, or other companies like Tegrity, Granicus, MediaSite) over the next year.

 

As more classrooms come online through the Bond construction work, more faculty should have the opportunity to make the transition to computer-based materials supporting lectures, where and when that is appropriate for their curriculum and for their students. With an institutional commitment to increasing student success, to improving retention, and to encouraging excellence as well as innovation in our teaching, lecture capture could – and should – become an integral part of the overall package of educational resources we provide to our students.


 


Chabot College Tegrity Pilot
Faculty User Comments & Questions

 

Positives Thus Far

+        With PowerPoint, zipping to any points within the lecture is very easy.

+        Searching on PowerPoint text or webpage text is great - IF it is indeed text and not a graphic.

+        Once set up initially, subsequent recording is a snap.

+        Using a remote wireless PowerPoint presenter mouse and wireless microphone makes recording a narrated lecture very easy, with no restrictions on movement.

+        Availability on any computer anytime to view lecture is very nice.

+        Content uploads in background, and will auto-pause and auto-restart once a computer is disconnected and later reconnected to the net.

+        Easy to copy/move content around once uploaded.

+        Relatively easy to administer with Excel spreadsheet to associate users with courses and update it from anywhere, anytime.

+        Relatively easy to get going, even without dedicated tutorial.

+        Webcam picture is quite good for individual close-up images.  With proper placement you can read chalk/whiteboard writing in a limited area.

+        Installation of the recorder software was easy; getting PCs and Macs set up was simple.

Negatives Thus Far

-        Can't  swap windows to select where the video and where the computer application display appears.

-        Sound with xTag microphones is not as clear as hoped.

-        Output is not as smooth as with Camtasia.

-        In recorder mode, you can't see what you are recording from the camera unless you put the recorder into full-screen camera mode, but then PowerPoint/web/PC applications aren’t visible.

-        In full-screen mode, you don't have access to controls to pause or play or stop the playback as a student or see other applications running to toggle between them.

-        Creating DVD movie doesn't produce a file that can be played on a DVD; it is computer video only, and would need to be converted.

-        Using external camera is not well documented; it isn't clear what models or interfaces are supported, and using standard SONY camera didn't work.

-        Some native software with text on the screen don't appear to be searchable within the uploaded video.

-        Adding extra content to lectures (weblinks, PDFs, etc.) is rather cumbersome.

-        You can't use most webcams with a Mac (yet … expected to be coming for summer 09)

 

Glitches and Gotcha's

Ø      Using webcam, autofocus might need to be turned off, and auto-light balance as well, depending upon the lighting, the sheen of the whiteboard, and clothing worn.

Ø      Using auto-following with the webcam is a bit jerky and may need to be turned on or tuned to capture only a portion of the chalkboard or whiteboard.

Ø      Don't forget to turn on your microphone!

Ø      Using xTag microphones "resets" default audio playback device, so some tweaking of the SOUND control panel on PCs is required to make playback work.  (Recording works OK).

Ø      If you start Tegrity first, then put it in *pause* mode, THEN start PowerPoint, your slides may not be searchable.  You can either start PowerPoint, then start Tegrity, or start recording, then start PowerPoint.  But if you use full-screen "presentation mode" with PowerPoint you lose the command bar below and can't "find" the Tegrity recorder icon.

Ø      Upload time for lectures can range from 5 minutes to 45 minutes - a bit unpredictable.



Chabot College Tegrity Pilot Project

Student Response Summary

 

Physics 4C (Hildreth) – 12 lectures recorded (8.5 hours)

9 responses; 13 students logged in to access lectures; 27 viewing sessions logged, 10 hours accessed

 

All full-time students;

All but two accessed 1-5 times; (1) respondent never accessed, (1) accessed 6 – 10 times

(4) answered rarely used Tegrity; (3) answered sometimes, (2) never

(5) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective; (3) answered Tegrity made study much more effective; (1) answered no impact.

(8) of 9 said impact of Tegrity contributed substantially or somewhat to learning

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • The quality of the videos are a little low, so its’ a bit hard to follow the instructor
  • When I missed a couple of classes, I was able to go back and view the lectures to see what I missed.
  • If I was absent in a particular class I will be able to catch up what was going on in class, which is helpful to students.
  • I was able to go to Tegrity and clarify things we went over in class.
  • I got to review something I wasn’t clear about; you can repeat a couple times until you get it.
  • It helped a little because it helped me go over some of the things I didn’t get the first time.
  • Made it easier to take notes; less worry over hanging on every word
  • Because when I study sometimes I miss something in class and can go over it again

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • I used it more (2)
  • The videos were better (2)
  • It had better compatibility; Often crashed with Firefox

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

 

Increased somewhat ~50%       No impact ~50%

 

Rate ease of use:

(4) Very easy                           (2) Easy                                   (3) Acceptable

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes, because I can focus on the material that I don’t understand and skip certain stuff
  • Yes.  It’s like going to class twice but the second time it’s at your own pace.
  • Yes, because I think if used it is very beneficial.
  • Yes.  It’s good to use playing the lectures over and over again
  • Yes I would.  It is a great way to go back and review the lecture for anything missed or misunderstood.
  • I would recommend that it is useful for most of the students.  I wish we were trying it in all the classes.
  • Yes.  It offers more information and another study tool.

Tegrity Student Survey Results - Physics 4C (cont.)

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

 

  • Yes; I think science classes need it more
  • Yes.  In case students don’t get something and some students may be too shy to ask the teacher to repeat more than once.
  • Yes, because its another source of learning that would be available for me.
  • Yes.  It is good for students.
  • Yes I would.  It would greatly improve how we learn from lecltures.  Some classes can help more than others beside just physics.
  • Yes because sometimes I come to class late and could go home and go over the lecture.
  • Only if it is convenient.  Class recording are very helpful but not all professors have the resources to record their classes.
  • Yes it helps students go over the lesson again if they didn’t understand it the first time.
  • Yes for teachers like math and some other science classes.

 


 

Astronomy 10 (Hildreth)  - 4 lectures recorded (2 hours)

4 responses; 4 students logged in to access lectures; 8 viewing sessions logged

(3) Part-time, (1) full-time student

(3) accessed 1-5 times; (1) respondent never accessed

(3) answered rarely used Tegrity; (1) never

(2) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective; (1) answered Tegrity made study much more effective; (1) answered no impact.

(3) of 4 said impact of Tegrity contributed substantially or somewhat to learning

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • I can hear the lecture again and focus on the main points
  • I played the first session once when I missed class
  • I was able to hear the lecture I missed

 

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • I had used it
  • The sound was clearer.

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~50%       No impact ~50%

 

Rate ease of use:           (3) Very easy

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes, if they miss class more than once.
  • Yes, especially if they missed lectures.  The lectures are entertaining

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?    Yes (unanimously)

Tegrity Student Survey Results (cont.)

 


 

Machine Tool Technology (Long)   12 lectures recorded (6 hours)

9 responses; 29 students logged in; 190 viewing sessions;  46+ hours access time

 

(4) part-time student, full time job, 25/older;

(1) part-time student, full-time job, 17-24

(2) part-time student, part-time job, 25/older;

(2) full-time student, 25 or older.

 

(4) accessed 1-5 times; (5) accessed 6-10 times

(5) answered often used Tegrity; (4) sometimes

 

(5) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

(3) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

(1) answered no impact.

 

(5) of 9 said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

(3) of 9 said significantly;          

(1) of 9 said impact was very substantial

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • I can see it over if I haven’t understood yet
  • I can review anything I missed during class lectures anytime I want and anthing I forgot in the old lecture
  • It helped me understand more
  • Since my professor [already] makes movies which are a great help for visual learners any aid like these are welcome.
  • It helps eliminate hand notes that are sometimes incomplete or inaccurate.  Visually help place important points into long term memory
  • Get to see the lecture at home
  • When a question while studying came up, I could review the process from the recorded videos of the class.
  • I could review the lesson at will.  I reviewed several times.

 

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If more classes were recorded
  • Screen resolution or reviewability were improved – you could have one but not the other.
  • If it was used at the beginning of the semester.

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Significantly increased ~ 22%    Increased somewhat ~55%                   No impact ~22%

 

Rate ease of use:           (5) Very easy;              (3) Easy;          (1) Acceptable

 

 

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results - Machine Tool Technology (cont.)

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes, because you can repeat complicated lectures when you want to
  • Yes if they are trying to do this stuff without visuals they are disregarding valuable resources
  • Sure – it helps me so I think it would help my classmates as well
  • Yes – it would be stupid not to
  • Yes – being able to see it at home.
  • Yes – helps review important class lecture points with efficiency.
  • Yes – it never hurts to have extra information on call

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes, if they are willing and its cost-effective for the school
  • Yes if their time is a small amount to use it.
  • If they can or are willing
  • Yes – it is easy and convenient.
  • Yes – some people don’t get everything the first time
  • Yes, so that we can review the lecture or part  we miss or we don’t understand until we get it.
  • Yes it helps for clarity when trying to study away from school where the instructor might not be available to repeat or refresh a subject.

 


 

Philosophy 50  (Shannon) – 10 lectures recorded (9.5 hours)

 

60 responses to survey; 11 students logged into access lectures; 40 sessions; ~6.5 hours access time

(44) full time students, 17-24;

(1) full-time student 25/older

(8) part-time student, full-time job, 17-24;

(5) part-time student, part-time job, 17-24

(1) part-time student, part-time job, 25/older;

(1) part-time student, full-time job, 25/older

 

(36) said they logged in 1-5 times;

(16) never;

(5) said they logged in 6-10 times;

(2) said they logged in more than 20;

(1) said logged in 11-20 times

(Note that recorded statistics only indicate 1 person logged in 9 times, 1 person 8 times, and the remaining 8 logged in 4 or less times, so some of the student survey data is therefore suspect.)

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results - Philosophy 50 (cont)

 

Of the ~ 44 students who indicated they used Tegrity:

 

~20 answered sometimes used Tegrity; ~24 rarely used Tegrity

(16) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

 (20) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

 (9) answered no impact.

 (18) said Tegrity contributed significantly or very substantially to learning;

(21) said Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

 (7) said it did not contribute to learning

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • The lecture helps the most, and taking notes.
  • It helps to review
  • It helps to review the lecture again; also what I wasn’t able to include in my notes, I was able to get through Tegrity
  • When I used it, it was helpful because I don’t write fast so its great that I can come back and see everything I missed.
  • I can review anything I missed during class lectures anytime I want
  • It helps me review the last class and give more explanation and really helps
  • It helped me understand more
  • When I don’t have time and miss a class then am behind on things but after the Tegrity I was on time.
  • I could refer to lecture material while studying
  • Since I attended class regularly I did not need Tegrity to get notes.
  • When I tried to view videos, it wouldn’t work, even when  I installed what it asked me to, so I didn’t bother*
  • I tried to login but it wanted me to install something in order to view a lesson.*

 

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If it was used at the beginning of the semester. (# 1 response by far)
  • The graphics and camera system would have been better
  • If my computer had not freezed up
  • If the video had been better/cleaner
  • If the video had worked*
  • Board capture camera more clear; hard to see
  • Better sound
  • More advanced technology
  • If I didn’t have to install anything*
  • If the subject of the lecture was included in the date (title): e.g. May 1: Aristotle

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Significantly increased ~  5                                Increased somewhat ~ 13

Between no impact and Increased somewhat ~ 14                   No impact ~ 13

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results  - Philosophy 50 (cont)

 

Rate ease of use:           ~10 Very easy;             ~20 Easy;         ~15 Acceptable;           (1) Not easy

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • For that that have a problem coming to class
  • Very helpful when it comes to studying
  • Yes if you are a slow writer
  • You can learn at your own pace
  • Yes it can help them study the information they forgot to put in their notes
  • Yes – it helps me and I think it would help my classmates as well
  • Yes – being able to see it at home.
  • Yes – helps review important class lecture points with efficiency.
  • Yes it makes the course easier
  • Yes – sometimes they go too fast in class
  • Yes – its helpful especially when you can’t remember something the instructor showed or talked about.
  • Yes; I would recommend Tegrity to everyone; it is especially useful in classes where there is a lot of lecturing

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

 

  • Yes – helps students a lot with understanding the subject
  • It would be [good?] if they used it, especially in difficult classes such as math, so you could watch again how they did everything.
  • Yes, if I was not able to come to class I could easily look it up
  • Yes – it comes in handy when you are a slow writer.
  • Yes – it really helps the students and tells you everything you have to do
  • Yes – it is easy and convenient.
  • Yes – some people don’t get everything the first time
  • No  - it gives some students a reason to skip class lectures
  • Yes, being able to record lectures is a very helpful tool.  Anytime I can hear a lecture again it is more likely I will be able to comprehend the subject.

 

 

* responses from students who indicated they never used Tegrity.

 


 


Tegrity Student Survey Results (cont.)

 

Speech 1 (Martinez) – 4 lectures recorded (3 hours)

6+ students logged in; 13+ sessions;  ~1 hours access time

 

Speech 1:  (24 surveys)

(15) full-time student, 17-24

(3) part-time student, 17-24,

(1) part-time student, part-time job, 17-24

(3) full-time student, 25 or older.

(2) part-time student, part-time job, 25 or older

 

(20) said they accessed 1-5 times; (4) never accessed

(12) answered rarely used Tegrity; (4) sometimes; (6) never

 

(4) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

(3) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

(13) answered no impact.

 

(10) of 24 said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

(1)  said significantly;    

(3)  said impact was very substantial

(5) said did not contribute

(1) said it was a distraction.

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • It is effective
  • It made me review what I had missed during the class time and it helped
  • It was time consuming since I didn’t have to use it for this class
  • We didn’t get to use it much but when I did log on I found that it worked great and was helpful
  • The first few times it was hard logging in so I didn’t want to go on.
  • Seeing my presentation aids and hearing myself helped me practice on speeches
  • Tegrity made it easier to study because I was able to review the class lecture and speeches.
  • It was great because it gave me the chance to review everything and understand and recognized things I didn’t during class.
  • It has a lot of useful notes that we had in class and could help me with the finals
  • It allowed me to see how I looked and sounded during my speeches.

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If volume was a bit clearer and less scratchy
  • I had really engaged myself with the program.
  • If it wasn’t new and used for more lectures.
  • If we had used it more in class.
  • If we had used it from the beginning of the semester.
  • If the camera could focus in on my face.

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Speech 1

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~20%                   No impact ~80%

 

Rate ease of use:           (3) Very easy;              (3) Easy;          (10) Acceptable;          (3) Not easy

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes
  • Yes if they have time
  • If they are into being online, then yes; if they’re like me and never go online, then no.
  • Yes for a speech class; you can see how well you did or bad
  • Yes because if you miss a class you won’t feel like you’re behind because you would have access to what we covered in class.

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes
  • Yes and No – yes for students who need to study more and no due to students not showing up and participating.
  • Yes any help for different types of students can’t be that harmful.

 

Speech 3 (Martinez) – 3 lectures recorded (~2.7 hours)

3+ students logged in; 16+ sessions;  ~3.6 hours access time

 

Speech 3: (6 surveys)

(2) full-time student, 17-24

(1) part-time student, 17-24,

 (2) full-time student, 25 or older.

 

(6) said they accessed 1-5 times;

(3) answered rarely used Tegrity; (2) sometimes; (1) never

 

(3) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

(1) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

(2) answered no impact.

 

(3) of 6 said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

(3) said did not contribute

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • I had the notes so it didn’t make a difference
  • It can help others to look back on what they missed in class.

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If we had used it more in class and didn’t have a login issue
  • If we had used it from the beginning of the semester.

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Speech 3 (cont.)

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~50%                   No impact ~50%

 

Rate ease of use:           (1) Very easy;              (1) Easy;          (2) Acceptable;            (2) Not easy

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes
  • Yes because it is a great reference tool
  • Yes, I love the idea of having all the info at your disposal
  • Yes I really recommend Tegrity because you can review your classes and it helps you to study.

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes
  • Yes in that it could help students in their being absent or wanting to review but also it is the student’s responsibility to stay on point during lecture
  • Yes because I can replay the class again.
  • It depends – sometimes I feel more confident.  And sometimes I feel nervous about being recorded.

 

Speech 10 (Martinez) – 3 lectures recorded (3+ hours)

2+ students logged in; 4+ sessions;  ~1.5 hours access time

 

Speech 10: (14 surveys)

(7) full-time student, 17-24

(3) part-time student, part-time job 17-24,

 (3) full-time student, 25 or older.

(1) Part-time student, part-time job, 25 or older

 

(11) said they accessed 1-5 times;

(8) answered rarely used Tegrity; (4) sometimes; (1) never, (1) often

 

(7) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

(5) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

(2) answered no impact.

 

(7) of 14 said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

(5) said it made a very significant or substantial contribution.

(2) said did not contribute

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • Lecture were more detailed and emphasized than PowerPoint materials.
  • I can always go back on lecture in case I missed anything in my notes

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Speech 10 (cont.)

 

  • The best possible study tool.  You get the info, written, seen, and you have it for all different learning styles more than once.
  • It gave me the missing link to my notes and it made the subject more understandable.
  • Don’t have to worry about missing class and missing the lecture info
  • Very informative.
  • Having something to go and check if I wrote my notes accurately is wonderful. 
  • Because there are always things and info that can’t be retained or written in class.  So reviewing the class online is so much better.
  • I would still use my notes but if I needed more clarification on my notes, I would listen to the lectures provided by Tegrity.
  • It is a good supplement to the lectures. 

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If lectures were not labeled by days but by topic
  • There was a visual
  • If I had more time to use it.
  • If I had an ipod

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~80%       Significantly Increased ~10%    No impact ~10%

 

Rate ease of use:           (3) Very easy;              (4) Easy;          (7) Acceptable

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes
  • Yes because sometimes you don’t catch everything the professor says.

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes
  • I think all classes should be recorded and access outside of class for review.  Tegrity has a big display and the quality is great.

 


 

Business 1A (Wong) – 8 lectures recorded (3.5  hours)

13+ students logged in; 63+ sessions; over 16 hours time

 

Bus 1A: (30 surveys)

(14) full-time student, 17-24

(2)  part-time student, full-time job 17-24,

(5) part-time student, part-time job 17-24,

(6) full-time student, 25 or older.

(3) Part-time student, part-time job, 25 or older

 

(26) said they accessed 1-5 times; (1) never

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Business 1A (cont.)

~50% answered rarely used Tegrity; ~50% sometimes;

 

~40% answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

~40% answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

~20% answered no impact or less effective

 

~60% said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

~20% said it made a very significant or substantial contribution.

~20%  said did not contribute

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • While studying at home and having the professor discussing key topics is extremely beneficial
  • Yes, through Tegrity it really makes students more efficient in learning
  • I was impressed with the impact the program made in understanding the lecture and inclass assignment.  What an innovation in notetaking!
  • Because of voice recording it’s like I am in the campus.  You can listen and read at the same time.
  • With Tegrity I can play back over and over again until I’m sure I understand the material.  In class the instructor can’t take too much time for one person.
  • It was excellent to be able to hear my professor explaining the chapters and interact with the poiwerpoint slides to emphasize certain parts of the lecture.  It was nice to be able to flip through and find what I needed additional help with.
  • It was much easier to understand the lecture.

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If I had more time
  • If I had logged in earlier.
  • If Tegrity was used more extensively in this course, with more lectures available.

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~80%       Significantly Increased ~10%    No impact ~10%

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes
  • Yes because its like going to class another day, without having to leave your home.
  • Of course – it is a helpful tool to understand the class knowledge better.
  • Yes definitely
  • Yes, it as if having the teacher at your beck and call.
  • Absolutely.  It is an awesome tool.  In stead of just reading from the book, I get the opportunity to see PowerPoint and hear the lectures.  100% benefit.
  • Yes, you can go over chapters you don’t understand, hear the instructor go over items you missed in class, and use it anytime you have time.
  • Yes because if for some reason you can’t go to class you have the chance to review.  Also some people get distracted very easily during class, and Tegrity is the place to learn more.

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Business 1A (cont.)

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes; it is easy to use.
  • Yes because some students don’t get it and are too shy to ask questions. 
  • Absolutely, I would recommend to record their classes using Tegrity, that way, later on blackboard they could be reviewed.
  • Yes, Highly recommended!
  • Yes – video lectures would be even better.
  • Yes because it keeps track of how students are actually using it
  • Yes I would – that way if I miss a point I can go back to the session and not have to access the teacher and utilize their time.
  • I would request my professors to record their lectures using Tegrity although they should be prepared for student attendance to drop as a result.
  • I would absolutely request that they record during class.  Sometimes I am so busy taking notes that I miss something, I would have the advantage of listening to the lectures again and being able to pay full attention to the lecture.
  • Yes, you can get more involved with class and lecture.

 

Computer Science 14 (Wong) – 2 lectures recorded (0.5 hours)

15+ students logged in; 38 sessions; 4+ hours

 

CS 14 : (15 surveys)

(6) full-time student, 17-24

(1) part-time student, Full-time job 17-24,

(2) part-time student, part-time job 17-24,

 (5) full-time student, 25 or older.

(1) Part-time student, part-time job, 25 or older

 

(13) said they accessed 1-5 times;

(12) answered rarely used Tegrity;  (2) never,

 

(11) answered Tegrity made student somewhat more effective;

(2) answered Tegrity made study much more effective;

(2) answered no impact.

 

(11) said impact of Tegrity contributed somewhat to learning;

(2) said it made a very significant or substantial contribution.

(2) said did not contribute

 

Overall, please rate the impact of Tegrity on your studying in this course (comments)

  • Good to listen while doing other tasks on the computer (2 monitors).  Helped to reinforce
  • I could get help from Tegrity anytime I want.  It’s not as helpful as an instructor or tutor.
  • I think Tegrity helped me somehow because it is visual and I can see how it works.
  • I saw what I did wrong by looking at her presentation.  I also missed that class and am glad I had the review for the final.

 

Tegrity Student Survey Results   Computer Science 14 (cont.)

 

  • The audio helps me understanding the program.
  • You can repeat and slow down the speed

Complete the sentence: My experience with Tegrity would have been better if:

  • If lectures were divided into sections with outlines
  • If it gives more features just like Blackboard
  • I used it more often (lack of time.)
  • There were more lectures.
  • If used for the entire semester.
  • The video was better (higher quality.)
  • The sound clarity was improved and text size larger

 

Impacted course experience compared to courses where Tegrity was not used:

Increased somewhat ~40%       Significantly Increased ~10%    No impact ~50%

 

Rate ease of use:           (4) Very easy;              (5) Easy;          (4) Acceptable

 

Would you recommend Tegrity to your classmates?

  • Yes, it’s simple to use and if the material was very difficult or I missed class, I would imagine this could be very useful since it essentially allows you to review a lecture infinite times.
  • Yes because it is an extra source to learn the material covered in class.
  • Yes, helpful useful before and after coming to class.
  • Yes – it’s a fun and interactive way of learning stuff.  And if one misses class one day, they could easily log on to watch what they missed.
  • Yes I would.  It’s a useful website.  It’s easier to use Tegrity than Blackboard.

 

Would you request that professors record their classes using Tegrity?

  • Yes its very common not to catch everything in class so having a fall back would be useful.
  • yes for review
  • Yes – it would be really helpful to students and their overall learning experience.  And it would allow them to clarify material for themselves without constantly interrupting the lecture to ask questions.
  • Yes I sometimes may not have time to attend class so it’s a good way to get materials.
  • Some classes only, especially science.
  • Yes, its is a good way to [?] an online course, but otherwise no because people might stop going to class.
  • Yes because things can be explained better through video.
  • Yes I would.  If professors record their classes using Tegrity, students can use them to do the review anytime.  And its very helpful if students miss their class.
  • Yes, I already record some of my instructors.  Tegrity will have a better organization than me.

 



Last updated: 6/10/2009

Chabot College

Scott Hildreth’s Website