Engineering Courses

These listings are sourced from Curricunet, and some courses may not be offered every semester. For additional information, contact the academic department, speak with counseling or refer to the current Class Schedule and College Catalog.

ENGR 10 - Introduction to Engineering    ( 2.00 Units )
Introduction to careers, activities, and topics related to the field of engineering, including computer applications, design and problem solving. Help students determine what degrees and certificates are needed to reach their engineering career of choice. Complete engineering sample projects including bridge design, 3D modeling/3D printing, robotics, and circuits. This course will help determine if engineering is the career for you.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Describe the Engineering-Practice in THREE Major Engineering Fields (e.g.: CHEMICAL, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL, INDUSTRIAL, MATERIALS, MECHANICAL) including Specific EXAMPLES of Projects, Products, or Processes which an Engineer in each of these fields might Design.
  2. Describe the Ethical Responsibilities of Practicing Engineering in terms of three Components: the general nature of ethics, general ethical models, and the engineering ethical code established by the National Council of Examiners of Engineering and Surveying (NCEES)

ENGR 11 - Engineering Design and Analysis    ( 2.00 Units )
An introduction to the engineering design process from a practical and professional perspective. Student teams work on a term-long engineering project that entails the creation of a design for a useful object with moving parts that requires the application of some external power source. Conceptual and Critical/Final design reviews require teams to describe and justify the effectiveness, and likely customer-acceptance, of the design. The student designers: select materials, components, sources of supply; produce detailed parts-lists; create using CAD-tools detailed and dimensioned production and assembly drawings; create formal electrical and fluid-control component interconnection schematics; provide a detailed estimate for the production-cost. When needed students use engineering software tools (such as MATLAB) to assess and predict the kinematical, structural, thermal, electrical, fluid-flow, wear/corrosion, optical, and magnetic performance of the proposed design. Students are encouraged to build from the design plans a form-and-fit mock-up, or if possible a fully functioning prototype.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Student are to create a design for Tide-Pool Wave maker which will gently agitate a benchtop marine biology tank containing Tide-Pool organisms.  Students will learn how create a detailed and justified Concept-Level description of the proposed design and present and defend the design, concept before a knowledgeable and skeptical audience in Engineering Practice this presentation is known as Critical Desgin Review (CRDR)
  2. Student are to create a design for Tide-Pool Wave maker which will gently agitate a benchtop marine biology tank containing Tide-Pool organisms. Students will learn how create a detailed and justified Concept-Level description of the proposed design and present and defend the design, concept before a knowledgeable and skeptical audience in Engineering Practice this presentation is known as the CONCEPTUAL Design Review (CDR). Jul2011
  3. Student are to create a design for Tide-Pool Wave maker which will gently agitate a benchtop marine biology tank containing Tide-Pool organisms. Students will learn how create a detailed and justified Production-Ready description of the proposed design and present and defend the design, concept before a knowledgeable and skeptical audience in Engineering Practice this presentation is known as Final Desgin Review (FDR)
  4. Student are to create a design for Tide-Pool Wave maker which will gently agitate a benchtop marine biology tank containing Tide-Pool organisms. Students will learn how create a detailed and justified Production-Ready description of the proposed design and present and defend the design, concept before a knowledgeable and skeptical audience in Engineering Practice this presentation is known as the CRITICAL Review (CrDR). Jul2011

ENGR 15 - Engineered Systems and Sustainability    ( 3.00 Units )
An introduction to key engineered systems (e.g., energy, water supply, buildings, transportation) and their environmental impacts. Basic principles of environmental science needed to understand natural processes as they are influenced by human activities. Overview of concepts and methods of sustainability analysis. Critical evaluation of engineering approaches to address sustainability.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Define key engineered systems (e.g. energy, water supply, buildings, transportation, etc.) and their environmental impacts.
  2. Define environmental science natural processes and determine how they are influenced by human activity.
  3. Write an analysis and evaluate a current engineering systems' sustainability practices.

ENGR 16 - Designing Information Devices and Systems I    ( 4.00 Units )
This course focuses on the fundamentals of designing modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world, providing a foundation for core topics in signal processing, learning, control, and circuit design while introducing key linear-algebraic concepts motivated by applications. Modeling is emphasized to deepen mathematical maturity in both labs and homework, students will engage computationally, physically, and visually with the concepts being introduced.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Define and discuss the application domains of imaging and tomography, touchscreens, GPS and localization.
  2. Model and use linear structures to solve circuits and computer information and storage problems.
  3. Define linear circuits, and discuss how they connect to the physical world.
  4. Correlate the use of linear circuits, and the capabilities of what can be processed computationally.

ENGR 22 - Engineering Design Graphics    ( 3.00 Units )
Introduction to the engineering-design process, and to technical-graphic communications tools used by engineers. Conceptual design of products. Development of spatial reasoning skills. Orthographic and axonometric projection-drawing techniques. Tolerance analysis for fabrication. Documentation of designs through engineering working-drawings. Use of AutoCAD Computer-Assisted Drawing software as a design tool. Basic CAD 3-dimensional solid-modeling.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Analyze the FORM of Mechanical Object as depicted by 3-Dimensional Pictorial Representation to determine the objects FUNCTION => Explain or infer how the form of the bearing block dictates its function
  2. Apply Quantitative and Accurate physical Dimensions (distances & Sizes) to Machined Mechanical Object Depicted in a 3-Dimensional Pictorial Representation of the Object => Apply Dimensions to describe the relative size of features and hole placement
  3. Convert a 3-Dimensional Pictorial Representation of a Machined Mechanical Object to an accurate & complete ORTHOGRAPHIC PROJECTION Representation of the Object => Differentiate between front & top views, and visible & hidden Surfaces/Features
  4. Effectively Describe the Spatial Shape and/or Form a Machined Mechanical Object Depicted in a 3-Dimensional Pictorial Representation of the Object => Describe the Height, Width and Depth of the (HWD) Object, Perhaps referring to a Similar Common Shape
  5. Use Correct Mechanical Engineering Terminology to identify significant features of a Machined Mechanical Object Depicted in a 3-Dimensional Pictorial Representation of the Object => Use Technical Terms to described rounded ends, drilled holes of the flange, and the boss around the center hole

ENGR 25 - Computational Methods for Engineers and Scientists    ( 3.00 Units )
Methodology and techniques for solving engineering/science problems using numerical-analysis computer-application programs MATLAB, SimuLink, MuPad, and EXCEL. Technical computing and visualization using MATLAB software. Examples and applications from applied-mathematics, physical-mechanics, electrical circuits, biology, thermal systems, fluid systems, and other branches of science and engineering. May not receive credit if Mathematics 25 or Physics 25 has been completed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Given a data set that can be modeled by either a Power-function or an Exponential-function linearize the data, and then perform a Linear Regression using MATLAB or EXCEL software to determine the best-case fitting constants m & b.
  2. Solve by HAND, using differential calculus, for an independent variable that will optimize/minimize/maximize some dependent variable quantity that results from the analysis of a real-world situation-scenario.
  3. Use MATLABs SimuLink InterConnected-Icon based programming environment to create a SimuLink FeedBack Diagram that produces a graph of the numerical solution to a NONlinear, NonHomogeneous, Second order Differential Equation.
  4. Use base-MATLAB commands to create a script file that produces a graph of the numerical solution to a Nonlinear, NonHomogeneous, Second order Differential Equation.
  5. Use MATLAB’s native “APP”, MuPad, to produce a SYMBOLIC-equation solution to a Linear, NonHomogeneous, Second order Differential Equation.

ENGR 36 - Engineering Mechanics -Statics    ( 3.00 Units )
Force systems under equilibrium conditions; vector properties of forces, moments, couples, and resultants; rigid body structures; hydrostatics; shear and bending-moment diagrams; friction; centroids; area/mass moments of inertia. Graphical, algebraic, and numerical (computer) solutions of vector mechanics problems.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Analyze a Static (non-moving), Force/Moment loaded Frame, Machine, or Truss (FMT) using Newtonian mechanics to determine unknown INTERNAL and EXTERNAL Force(s) and/or Moment(s)
  2. Construct the SHEAR (V) and Bending-Moment (M) Diagram for a transversely-load Structural Beam
  3. Communicate legible solutions which may be understood by other engineers

ENGR 40 - Thermodynamics    ( 3.00 Units )
This course introduces the fundamentals of energy storage, thermophysical properties of liquids and gases, and the basic principles of thermodynamics. The course focuses on application of the concepts to various areas of engineering related to energy conversion and air conditioning. The use of computing tools that facilitate problem solving, design analysis, and parametric studies in thermodynamics will be integrated throughout the course.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Understand thermodynamic fundamental concepts and laws.
  2. Develop analytic ability in real-world engineering applications using thermodynamics principles.
  3. Perform basic analysis of performances of energy systems and power cycles.
  4. Develop skills in applying computing tools including Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to facilitate problem solving.

ENGR 43 - Electrical Circuits and Devices    ( 4.00 Units )
Introduction to basic electrical engineering circuit-analysis and devices. DC, transient and AC circuit analysis methods, Kirchoff’s laws, nodal/mesh analysis, network theorems, voltage and current sources, resis¬tors, capacitors and inductors. Thévenin/Norton equivalent circuits. Natural and forced response of first and second order circuits. Steady-state sinusoidal circuit voltage/current analysis, and power calculations. Frequency response, phasors, Bode plots and transfer functions. Low/High/Band pass filters. Operational Amplifiers in DC, transient, and AC circuits. Diode and NMOS/PMOS FET characteristics. Diode and MOSFET circuits. Introduction to basic integrated-circuit technology and layout. Digital signals, logic gates, switching. Combinatorial logic circuits using AND/NAND OR/NOR gates. Sequential logic circuits using RS, D, and JK Flip-Flop gates. Computer based circuit-operation simulation using SPICE and MATLAB software. Electronics labora¬tory exercises demonstrating basic instruments, and experimental tech¬niques in Electrical Engineering: DC current/voltage supplies, Digital MultiMeters (DMM), RLC Meters, oscilloscopes, and AC function generators. Measurements of resistance, inductance, capacitance, volt¬age, current, transient response, and frequency response.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Analyze a Steady-state DIRECT Current circuit to determine unknown electrical quantities and/or responses.
  2. Analyze Steady-state ALTERNATING Current circuit
  3. Analyze Steady-state DC-RLC, AC-RLC, and Op-Amp circuits to calculate unknown electrical-potentials or electrical-currents using Kirchoff's Current and/or Voltage Law, and the Ideal Op-Amp approximation
  4. Laboratory Practicum to Demonstrate the ability to construct an AC sinusoidal electrical circuit and then use a DMM and Oscilloscope to measure circuit voltages & currents, and to calculate voltage amplitudes & phase-angles.

ENGR 45 - Materials of Engineering    ( 4.00 Units )
Application of principles of chemistry and physics to the properties of engineering materials. The relation of micro-structure to mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties of metals. Solid material phase equilibria and transformations. The physical, chemical, mechanical and optical properties of ceramics, composites, and polymers. Operation and use of materials characterization instruments and methods.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Explain the relationship between the internal structure of materials and their macroscopic properties.
  2. Explain methods (intentional or unintentional) of altering the structure of materials by mechanical, chemical, or thermal means in order to change material properties.
  3. Gather data from reference sources regarding the properties, processing, and performance characteristics of materials, and use it as a basis to recommend appropriate material(s) to meet engineering design criteria.
  4. Measure material properties and/or evaluate processing treatments using standard materials testing equipment and techniques. Write laboratory reports that communicate the collection, analysis, and interpretation of experimental data according to professional engineering standards.

ENGR 47 - Engineering Dynamics    ( 3.00 Units )
This course covers dynamics for engineering applications, where motion is involved. It includes the kinematics and dynamics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Also included are orbital motion and satellites, vibrations, which are present in many engineering situations, Euler angles, which are necessary to completely describe the orientation of an object in space, and variable mass systems, such as rockets and jet engines.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. justify the physical principles and corresponding formulas that give a mathematical model of a dynamic physical system;
  2. generate the solution to the mathematical model of a dynamic system for requested information;
  3. create a computer model of a dynamic engineering system.

ENGR 85 - Introduction to Solid Mechanics    ( 3.00 Units )
This course reviews the concepts of stresses, strains and material laws with emphasis on elastic properties as well as yield and fracture criteria. Topics include stresses and strains in beams, torsion, deformations of beams and frames, work and energy, statically indeterminate beams and frames, second order bending theory, and elastic instability.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. given a loading condition on a structural system. determine the forces (torques and/or moments) applied on each structural member of a system, and the internal forces and couples at internal sections, identify the applicable theory, and apply the appropriate equations to calculate the internal stresses, strains and/or displacements,
  2. perform coordinate transformations of the state of stress and strain at a point, including using Mohr’s Circle.
  3. determine if a structural system meets its design specifications, and/or determine how the system will fail, given or having calculated the stresses, strains and displacements.