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Upcoming English Courses

2021-2022 Academic Year Literature and Creative Writing Classes

The following is the schedule of our literature and creative writing offerings for the 2021-2022 academic year. This list does NOT include our core composition courses (ENGL 1, 4A, 7A, and 102), which are offered in multiple sections every semester. Note that some literature courses are offered only every other year. Please contact English Faculty Homeira Foth hfoth@chabotcollege.edu for questions about schedules. See below for complete class descriptions and information:

Fall 2021 Literature and Creative Writing Courses

(Note: Specific information about course schedules below. All Fall 2021 literature and creative writing classes will be offered online with no required on-campus meetings. Some classes will still meet virtually at scheduled times; other classes will have no required meeting times. Check details for each class.)

English 11 A/B/C: Creative Writing

Colorful designs coming out of inkpen tip.

English 11A/B/C is a fun and dynamic class that will allow you to explore your writer's voice in a safe and supportive community. We'll complete exercises in both poetry and fiction that will help you develop your skills and stretch your imagination. All levels of experience are welcome!

*Register for English 11A if you have never taken the course; register for 11B if you are taking the course for the second time; register for 11C if you are taking the course for the third time.

English 11A/B/C is an online course with no required on-campus meetings. Course does not meet on specific days and times.

Instructor: Theresa Puckett, tpuckett@chabotcollege.edu

English 12 A/B: The Craft of Writing: Fiction

Mural of drummer in half day half night

Storytelling is an ancient art form traditionally passed down by the most observant members of a community, the people who were born to spin tales of possibility.  We all have stories inside ourselves to share. In this class, we’ll mine our minds for the stories we need to pass on. We’ll write short pieces of fiction filled with rich characters and lively settings. We’ll read stories by writers like David Wong Louie, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes, Tim O’Brien, Sandra Cisneros, and other greats who have added their own unique stamp, their own musical voices into this ancient art. Expect to write regularly and to share your drafts in a supportive writing workshop ritual.  No previous experience with writing fiction is required.

Schedule note: This class meets online every Wednesday from 7:00 pm-9:50 pm. The Zoom meetings allow us to write together and interact as a community. If you cannot participate in the regular Zoom meetings but still want to take the  class, I will provide additional, replacement assignments for you to complete so you can learn about fiction writing on your own time.

Instructor: Kristin Land, kland@chabotcollege.edu

English 22: Mexican American/Latino Literature of the U.S.

Photograph of mural on Mi Tierra Foods in Berkeley

We will read poetry, fiction, plays, and autobiography by writers of Latin American descent in the U.S. We will go back in time to the 1400 and 1500s; we will look at the politics and writing of the 1960s Chicano Movement; we will look how poets today consider and complicate Latinx identity in terms of race, nationality, gender, sexuality, and immigration status. In this class we will read a variety of literature by U.S. Latinx authors, writing in different time periods and from different backgrounds.

MW 10:30-11:45am. This course meets weekly via Zoom on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. If you cannot meet at these times, you can still take the class and learn/interact at your own pace online. Online course with no required on-campus meetings.

Instructor: Simon Abramowitsch, sabramowitsch@chabotcollege.edu

English 25: Asian American Literature

Colorful graphic of South Asian imagery

​What is it like to live in the US but have roots in Asia? What is it like when your parents’ version of “home” or “respect” is not the same as yours? What do you say to someone who says “All Asians look alike”? Can you be Asian American if you don’t speak your parents’ language or eat the food your grandmother craves? In this class, we will explore great works of fiction, poetry and film that showcase Asian American experiences, with an emphasis on contemporary works. Class themes include the experiences of refugees and immigrants and the pressures of assimilation, but also generation gaps and culture clashes, battles over gender roles and stereotypes, and cultural pride. This discussion-based class is perfect for anyone looking to know more about the experiences of Asian-Americans and Asians in America. Prepare to enjoy.

TTh, 10:00-11:15a.m. Class will meet together virtually every Tuesday and Thursday from 10:00-11:15 a.m. You must be available, with your camera on, at that time. Online course with no required on-campus meetings. If you have questions, please contact Professor Tenn.

Instructor: Shoshanna Tenn, stenn@chabotcollege.edu

English 35: Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Collage by Romare Bearden, The Street (1964)

Explore what it means to be American and what it means to write America: Bustling cities, snow-covered country roads, family drama, political scandal, war-time trauma, manners, brutality, songs of self and the nation. Students will survey the literary periods of Realism, the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, and Post-Modernism and authors such as Edith Wharton, Langston Hughes, Eugene O'Neill, Ernest Hemingway, Toni Morrison, and more. Required for the English AAT Degree (Associate in Arts for Transfer).

MW, 12:00-1:15p.m. This course meets weekly via Zoom on Mondays and Wednesdays from 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. If you cannot meet at these times, you can still take the class and learn/interact at your own pace online. Online course with no required on-campus meetings.

Instructor: Mark Anderson, manderson@chabotcollege.edu

English 48: Literature of the Holocaust

Art Spiegelman, Self-Portrait With Maus Mask, 1989

In Literature of the Holocaust, we will read and think about how writers and filmmakers have tried to describe the experience and legacy of the Holocaust--the World War II genocide of Jews by the Nazis. How do people try to write about such terrifying, horrible REAL experiences? Graphic novels, autobiography, poetry, short story, and films try to figure it out! We will also think about how the Holocaust and Holocaust Literature relates to other racial genocides and oppression--in particular the history of American white supremacy against Indian and Black people that actually influenced Hitler.

TTH 7:00-8:25 p.m. This course meets weekly via Zoom on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 - 8:25 p.m. If you cannot meet at these times, you can still take the class and learn/interact at your own pace online. Online course with no required on-campus meetings.

Instructor: Simon Abramowitsch, sabramowitsch@chabotcollege.edu

Spring 2022 Literature and Creative Writing Courses

(Note: Updated information about Spring 2022 course schedules and type of instruction--online, in-person, hybrid--will be updated in Fall 2021, before registration period opens.)

Planned Spring 2022:

  • English 11 A/B/C: Introduction to Creative Writing
  • English 12 A/B: Craft of Writing: Fiction
  • English 13 A/B: Craft of Writing: Poetry
  • English 19: Chabot Review
  • English 20: Shakespeare
  • English 21: Evolution of the Black Writer
  • English 28: Youth Literature
  • English 31: Gay and Lesbian Literature
  • English 37: Proofreading for College Writing
  • English 41: World Literature
  • Service Learning 85A/B: Community Service

English 11 A/B/C: Introduction to Creative Writing

Art of color coing from pen

English 11A/B/C is a fun and dynamic class that will allow you to explore your writer's voice in a safe and supportive community. We'll complete exercises in both poetry and fiction that will help you develop your skills and stretch your imagination. All levels of experience are welcome!

*Register for English 11A if you have never taken the course; register for 11B if you are taking the course for the second time; register for 11C if you are taking the course for the third time.

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: Theresa Puckett, tpuckett@chabotcollege.edu

English 12 A/B: The Craft of Writing: Fiction

Mural of drummer in half day half night

Storytelling is an ancient art form traditionally passed down by the most observant members of a community, the people who were born to spin tales of possibility.  We all have stories inside ourselves to share. In this class, we’ll mine our minds for the stories we need to pass on. We’ll write short pieces of fiction filled with rich characters and lively settings. We’ll read stories by writers like David Wong Louie, Alice Walker, Langston Hughes, Tim O’Brien, Sandra Cisneros, and other greats who have added their own unique stamp, their own musical voices into this ancient art. Expect to write regularly and to share your drafts in a supportive writing workshop ritual.  No previous experience with writing fiction is required.

Schedule note: TBA

Instructor: Kristin Land, kland@chabotcollege.edu

English 13 A/B: The Craft of Writing: Poetry

Mural depicting woman letting birds free from cages

(Image: Kristy Sandoval’s mural "Decolonize" photographed by Richard Vogel for Mic)

In times of great change, poets unleash magical worlds as they document ordinary life. They teach us to digest difficult experiences and to nurture our hopeful resistance. They ground us in the beauty of a beehive or the wisdom of our ancestors.

 If you are curious how poets create such magic, or if you have unfinished song lyrics and secret poems scribbled in your notebook, then English 13A/B is for you. We will read poems from artists like Nikki Giovanni, Martín Espada, Kevin Young, Julian Randall, Mayda del Valle, Danez Smith, and Joy Harjo. We will write daily to play with poetic techniques, and we will share our drafts in a supportive writing workshop ritual.  By the end of the semester, you will have several poems in your pocket and a list of strategies to use if you want to perform at open-mics or send poems out for publication. No previous experience with writing poetry required. 

Schedule note: TBA

Instructor: Kristin Land, kland@chabotcollege.edu

English 19A/B: Chabot Review: Literary Magazine Workshop

Instructor: Monique Williams, mwilliams@chabotcollege.edu

English 20: Studies in Shakespeare

Image of William Shakespeare with sunglasses

Ever want to read and enjoy Shakespeare? Discuss, enact, understand, from poetry to profundity, the work of William Shakespeare in this transferable elective. And have fun too!

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: TBA

English 21: Evolution of the Black Writer

In this class we will explore and celebrate Black writers from the 1700s to the present, thinking about their artistry and ideas in historical contexts--the American Revolution; slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction; Jim Crow and the Great Migration; the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements; the post-civil rights era and the Movement for Black Lives. We will read poetry, autobiography, fiction, and watch plays and films.

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: Simon Abramowitsch, sabramowitsch@chabotcollege.edu

English 28: Youth Literature

Collage of youth literature books

Who am I? Where am I from? Is the world safe? How will I journey through this world? What is the difference between right and wrong? How can I be brave? How can I be me? Literature for young people helps them develop their identities, their understanding of the world, and their sense of their place in that world.This is a great course for analyzing culture through the stories we read to our young people and a great course for future teachers, including ECD majors. Reading and assignments will help you prepare for English 1.

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: Mark Anderson, manderson@chabotcollege.edu

English 31: Gay and Lesbian Literature

Brian Kenny mural celebrating Stonewall Riots

(Image: Brian Kenny's mural "Pay It No Mind" celebrating the Stonewall Riots)

LGBTQI+ people have been writing throughout human history, but only recently has the queerness of many of our greatest writers been acknowledged. In this class, we will examine queer literature in the context of queer history. After first assessing this moment in LGBTQI+ history and reading some contemporary queer authors, we will do some time-traveling and look at the LGBTQI+ experience from ancient times through the present, learning about the various queer movements that led us to this current moment, and reading some of the literature that came out of those movements. We will end the semester by reading some speculative literature about possible LGBTQI+ futures.

Schedule note: TBA

Instructor: Michael Langdon, mlangdon@chabotcollege.edu

English 37: Proofreading for College Writing

proofreading edits on paper

In ENGL 37, we will learn the components and rules of English grammar, syntax, and punctuation. We will work on identifying and correcting sentence-level errors in our own essays, and we will also use sentence-combining to help us produce more varied and sophisticated sentences. This course works well as a support class for writing-focused courses. It involves a strong writing component, but students may utilize assignments from other classes. It is a good class not only for students who want to improve their proofreading skills but also for future English teachers, creative writers, and anyone who wants a better understanding of language and syntax. 

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: Michael Langdon, mlangdon@chabotcollege.edu

English 41: World Literature

World map illustrated with book cover

“To understand just one life, you have to swallow the world” -  Salman Rushdie.

What do people around the world have in common?  the human condition.  We all experience joys and hardships in life. We love, we aspire, we create, but we also suffer, we fail, and we destroy. In studying world literature, we explore and learn about other cultures, other times. However, while we cross cultures and time periods, we also find experiences we have in common. We discover that no man is an island, and that what happens in one place, in one culture, greatly affects the rest of the world. In this class we will read eye-opening works of literature from both classic and contemporary authors including Voltaire, Keats, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Lu Xen, Woolf, Kafka, Mishima, Neruda, Pamuk, Allende, Desai, Adichie, and Al-Shaykh.

Schedule note: TBA

Instructor: Homeira Foth

Service Learning 85A/B

Gain hands on experience by volunteering! Help abandoned animals; serve meals to the community; work for the environment; do a project of your choice!

Schedule Note: TBA

Instructor: TBA