Philosophy Courses

These listings are sourced from Curricunet, and some courses may not be offered every semester. For additional information, contact the academic department, speak with counseling or refer to the current Class Schedule and College Catalog.

PHIL 50 - God, Nature, Human Nature    ( 3.00 Units )
Nature and range of philosophical inquiry in relation to everyday problems of humans as individuals, as citizen, as existing in nature, and as a creator of works of the arts and of the spirit. Analysis of primary philosophical documents that concentrate on these broad areas of a human's concerns. Introduction to Philosophy by the Philosophers' own works, their methods of procedure and inquiry; attention given to the development of skills for reading, analyzing, and pursuing philosophical argument.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Analyze and discuss major philosophical statements about humans, society, nature, the arts and the spirit.
  2. Understand and explicate the methods of philosophical inquiry, as demonstrated in particular works of consequence.
  3. Discuss and demonstrate understanding of key theoretical/contributions of Plato

PHIL 60 - Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics    ( 3.00 Units )
Examination of representative ethical theories. Problems of good and evil, right and wrong, individual and/or social action; principles, criteria or starting points for these issues and decisions as discussed and developed in great writings of the philosophical-literary tradition.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Examine and analyze perennial problems and views in ethics.
  2. Understand and employ the methods oh philosophical inquiry as demonstrated in particular works of consequence.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of key theoretical contributions of at least two of the following: Kant (deontology) or Mill or Bentham (utilitarianism), Aristotle (natural law), and Gilligan (care).

PHIL 65 - Introduction to Philosophy: Theory of Knowledge    ( 3.00 Units )
Primary works of philosophy in the areas of knowledge, truth, and thought. Systematic analysis of documents that constitute the major statements in the theory of knowledge—the functions of reasoning, intuition, and sense experience.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Examine and analyze pernnial problems and views in epistemology.
  2. Understand and emply the methods of philosophical inquiry as demonstrated in particular works of consequence.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of key theoretical contributions of at least two of the following: Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, and Kant.

PHIL 70 - Introduction to Political and Social Philosophy    ( 3.00 Units )
Philosophical-political analysis of value conflicts in the area of political thought and theory. Philosophical investigation of political principles which affect our lives as well as the role of theory in regard to the nature of the individual in a modern technological democracy. (Formerly PHIL 25)

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)
  1. Examine and analyze perennial problems and views in political and social philosophy.
  2. Understand and emply the methods of philosophical inquiry as demonstrated in particular works of consequence.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of key theoretical contributions of at least two of the following: Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli or Hobbes, Locke or Rousseau, Kant, Marx, and Rawls.